Building codes illustrated : a guide to understanding the 2012 international building code / Francis Ching, Steven Winkel

Call Number: TH420 .C49 2012

An easy-to-use, updated illustrated guide to the 2012 edition of the International Building Code

This unique reference to the 2012 International Building Code marries the graphic skills of bestselling author Frank Ching with the code expertise of Steven Winkel, FAIA. It pulls out the portions of the building code that are most relevant for the architect and provides an easy-to-understand interpretation in both words and illustrations. Rather than a text-heavy book, this is much more conducive to quick comprehension of the code, presenting information in an exciting user-friendly visual format.

(From Google Books)

Sheehy’s manual of emergency care / Emergency Nurses Association

Call Number: RC86.7 .S54 2013

Thoroughly revised and featuring a more efficient and streamlined design, the new 7th edition of Sheehy’s trusted emergency care resource offers complete, up-to-date coverage of the essentials emergency nurses need to know. Each condition commonly seen in the emergency setting is thoroughly addressed, from signs and symptoms, to diagnosis, treatment, developmental considerations, patient education, and more. Updated material and easy-to-reference contents make this resource a must-have for current practice.

(From Google Books)

It’s even worse than it looks : how the American constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism / Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein

Call Number: JK275 .M27 2012

Acrimony and hyperpartisanship have seeped into every part of the political process. Congress is deadlocked and its approval ratings are at record lows. America’s two main political parties have given up their traditions of compromise, endangering our very system of constitutional democracy. And one of these parties has taken on the role of insurgent outlier; the Republicans have become ideologically extreme, scornful of compromise, and ardently opposed to the established social and economic policy regime. In It’s Even Worse Than It Looks, congressional scholars Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein identify two overriding problems that have led Congress—and the United States—to the brink of institutional collapse. The first is the serious mismatch between our political parties, which have become as vehemently adversarial as parliamentary parties, and a governing system that, unlike a parliamentary democracy, makes it extremely difficult for majorities to act. Second, while both parties participate in tribal warfare, both sides are not equally culpable. The political system faces what the authors call “asymmetric polarization,” with the Republican Party implacably refusing to allow anything that might help the Democrats politically, no matter the cost. With dysfunction rooted in long-term political trends, a coarsened political culture and a new partisan media, the authors conclude that there is no “silver bullet” reform that can solve everything. But they offer a panoply of useful ideas and reforms, endorsing some solutions, like greater public participation and institutional restructuring of the House and Senate, while debunking others, like independent or third-party candidates. Above all, they call on the media as well as the public at large to focus on the true causes of dysfunction rather than just throwing the bums out every election cycle. Until voters learn to act strategically to reward problem solving and punish obstruction, American democracy will remain in serious danger.

(From Google Books)

The accordion family : boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition / Katherine S. Newman

Call Number: HQ755.86 .N4888 2012

Why are adults in their twenties and thirties stuck in their parents’ homes in the world’s wealthiest countries?

There’s no question that globalization has drastically changed the cultural landscape across the world. The cost of living is rising, and high unemployment rates have created an untenable economic climate that has severely compromised the path to adulthood for young people in their twenties and thirties. And there’s no end in sight. Families are hunkering down, expanding the reach of their households to envelop economically vulnerable young adults. Acclaimed sociologist Katherine Newman explores the trend toward a rising number of “accordion families” composed of adult children who will be living off their parents’ retirement savings with little means of their own when the older generation is gone.

While the trend crosses the developed world, the cultural and political responses to accordion families differ dramatically. In Japan, there is a sense of horror and fear associated with “parasite singles,” whereas in Italy, the “cult of mammismo,” or mamma’s boys, is common and widely accepted, though the government is rallying against it. Meanwhile, in Spain, frustrated parents and millenials angrily blame politicians and big business for the growing number of youth forced to live at home.

Newman’s investigation, conducted in six countries, transports the reader into the homes of accordion families and uncovers fascinating links between globalization and the failure-to-launch trend. Drawing from over three hundred interviews, Newman concludes that nations with weak welfare states have the highest frequency of accordion families while the trend is virtually unknown in the Nordic countries. The United States is caught in between. But globalization is reshaping the landscape of adulthood everywhere, and the consequences are far-reaching in our private lives. In this gripping and urgent book, Newman urges Americans not to simply dismiss the boomerang generation but, rather, to strategize how we can help the younger generation make its own place in the world.

(From Google Books)

The world according to Monsanto : pollution, corruption, and the control of the world’s food supply / Marie-Monique Robin

Call Number: HD9482.U64 M6613 2010

The result of a remarkable three-year investigation that took award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker Marie-Monique Robin across four continents (North and South America, Europe, and Asia). The World According to Monsanto tells the little-known yet shocking story of this agribusiness giant-the world’s leading producer of GMOs (genetically modified organisms)-and how its new “green” face is no less troubling than its PCB- and Agent Orange-soaked past.

Robin reports that, following its long history of manufacturing hazardous chemicals and lethal herbicides, Monsanto is now marketing itself as a “life sciences” company, seemingly conviced about the virtues of sustainable development. However, Monsanto now controls the majority of the yield of the world’s genetically modified corn and soy-ingredients found in more than 95 percent of American households-and its alarming legal and political tactics to maintain this monopoly are the subject of worldwide concern.

Released to great acclaim and controversy in France, throughout Europe, and in Latin America, The World According to Monsanto is sure to change the way we think about food safety and the corporate control of our food supply.

(From Google Books)

Parenting an athlete / Annette Reiter

Call Number: GV706.4 .G47 2011

The role that parents play in the development of their children is crucial, especially when it comes to athletics. While many parents today are aware of the need to provide their child with the best opportunities to succeed and excel in sports, many are completely unaware of the tremendous impact they have on their child’s attitude and self-esteem. Annette Reiter’s motivational book, Parenting an Athlete,looks at all angles of raising a sports-minded son or daughter, with the goal of guiding parents so that they positively and encouragingly interact-not interfere-with their child athlete. Having lived all sides of the ‘parenting and sports’ issue, Annette writes from an informed perspective of not only a coach dealing with parental roles but also as a proud and frustrated parent on the sidelines.

‘A must-read for parents, especially those whose student-athlete is approaching high school. Parents need to realize the profound influence they have on their child’s attitude, not only in athletics, but also in life.’
– Chris Hill, head basketball coach, Morrestown High School, and former college basketball player

(From Google Books)