New Children’s Books for April 2019

New Fiction

Alma and How She Got Her Name

By Juana Martinez-Neal
Call Number: PIC MAR
View in IvyCat

If you ask her, Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela has way too many names: six! How did such a small person wind up with such a large name? Alma turns to Daddy for an answer and learns of Sofia, the grandmother who loved books and flowers; Esperanza, the great-grandmother who longed to travel; José, the grandfather who was an artist; and other namesakes, too. As she hears the story of her name, Alma starts to think it might be a perfect fit after all — and realizes that she will one day have her own story to tell.

The Happy Book

By Andy Rash
Call Number: PIC RAS
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Camper is happy as a clam and Clam is a happy camper. When you live in The Happy Book, the world is full of daisies and sunshine and friendship cakes . . . until your best friend eats the whole cake and doesn’t save you one bite. Moving from happiness to sadness and everything in between, Camper and Clam have a hard time finding their way back to happy. But maybe happy isn’t the goal–being a good friend is about supporting each other and feeling all the feels together.

Croc & Turtle

By Mike Wohnoutka
Call Number: PIC WOH
View in IvyCat

Meet Croc! He is the strongest and fastest crocodile around.
Meet Turtle! He agrees that Croc is the strongest and fastest.
But what happens when Elephant lifts that heavy rock with ease? And when Cheetah speeds on by?
Croc and Turtle might not be the strongest or the fastest, but they’re definitely the best at something even more important . . .

Where is My Balloon?

By Ariel Bernstein
Call Number: PIC BER
 View in IvyCat

Owl has a balloon. Monkey has a sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole. But then Owl asks Monkey to hold his balloon, just for a second. What do you think happens? POP! When Owl returns and asks for his balloon, Monkey offers him everything under the sun…except for the balloon. Can their friendship survive this catastrophe?

The Donkey Egg

By Janet Stevens and Susan Stevens Crummel
Call Number: PIC STE
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Bear would rather sleep all day than work on his farm, and Fox knows just the kind of help he needs—a donkey! When Fox tricks Bear into buying a donkey egg, Bear can’t wait for it to hatch so he can meet his new friend. But donkeys don’t come from eggs! And when the “egg” finally opens, Bear gets a fruity surprise. Luckily, Bear doesn’t have to face disappointment alone . . . Hare is there to help!

New Nonfiction

Bloom Boom!

By April Pulley Sayre
Call Number: QK 49 .S32 2019 Spring
View in IvyCat

When spring arrives, flowers of all kinds sprout and grow buds and bloom. Sometimes, they bloom a few at a time. But other times, many will bloom at once in a colorful flower boom! This photographic exploration of flowers goes from the desert to the woodlands and beyond, celebrating their beautiful variety and the science behind these colorful displays.

My Happy Year by E. Bluebird (A Nature Diary)

By Paul Meisel
Call Number: QL 696 .P288 M4325 2019
View in IvyCat

“May 1. Today is my birthday.” So begins the wondrous first year of E. Bluebird. Readers are treated to the intimate details of her life such as “May 8: Eating all these bugs makes me poop. Mom takes my poop sack out of the nest. Good thing.” And “May 12: My brothers and sisters are getting ready to leave the nest. I like it here. It’s safe.” On May 18: “Where’s my family? I’m getting hungry. Okay. This is it! I jump! I flap! I’m flying!” She eventually migrates south, and when she returns north, she finds a mate and has a family of her own. What a happy year!

Gecko

By Raymond Huber
Call Number: QL 666 .L245 H83 2019
View in IvyCat

Meet the gecko, the escape artist of the lizard world. Hawks, rats, and snakes would love to catch one for their dinner, but the gecko’s amazing ability to protect itself and outsmart predators keeps it safe from day to day. The gecko is more than a match for its pursuers, using clever camouflage and dropping its tail as a decoy to evade them. And even beyond its escape abilities, the gecko is fascinating, with feet covered in tiny hairs for gripping (even upside down!) and eyes that it cleans with its tongue. This wonderful introduction to one of the coolest lizards on the planet will captivate amateur scientists.

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