New Forensics books

 

Forensic Botany: A Practical Guide

Edited by David W. Hall and Jason H. Byrd. Essentials of Forensic Science series

Call number: QK 46.5 .F67 H25 2012

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“An accessible introduction to the way in which botanical evidence is identified, collected and analysed in criminal cases … This book is written for those who have no formal background working with plants. It can be used as a practical guide for students taking forensic science courses, law enforcement training, legal courses, and as a template for plant collection at any scene where plants occur and where rules or laws are involved. Veterinarians, various environmental agencies, anthropologists, and archeologists are examples of disciplines that are more recently in need of plant evidence … The format of the book is designed to present the reader with all the information needed to conduct a botanical analysis of a crime scene; to highlight the forensic significance of the botanical evidence that may be present; how to collect that evidence in the correct manner and preserve and store that evidence appropriately; [and] how to conduct a laboratory analysis of the plants.” (Publisher) Illustrated throughout with high resolution photographs, the book also includes model lab and evidence data logs, chapter summaries, references, and an index.

Forensic Microbiology

Edited by David O. Carter, Jeffrey K. Tomberlin, M. Eric Benbow, and Jessica L. Metcalf. Forensic Science in Focus series

Call number: QH 313.5 .F67 .F68 2017

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This book is intended as a resource for students, microbiologists, investigators, pathologists, and other forensic science professionals. Forensic Microbiology focuses on newly emerging areas of microbiology relevant to medicolegal and criminal investigations: postmortem changes, establishing cause of death, estimating postmortem interval, and trace evidence analysis. Recent developments in sequencing technology allow researchers, and potentially practitioners, to examine microbial communities at unprecedented resolution and in multidisciplinary contexts. Detailed study of microbes facilitates the development of new forensic tools that use the structure and function of microbial communities as physical evidence. Chapters cover: experiment design, data analysis, sample preservation, the influence of microbes on results from autopsy, toxicology, and histology, decomposition ecology, and trace evidence.” (Publisher) Illustrated throughout with high resolution photographs. Each chapter is written by specialists and includes its own extensive references.

Fundamentals of Fingerprint Analysis, Second Edition

By Hillary Moses Daluz

Call number: HV 6074 .D353 2019

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“Building on the success of the first Edition—the first pure textbook designed specifically for students on the subject—Fundamentals of Fingerprint Analysis, Second Edition provides an understanding of the historical background of fingerprint evidence, and follows it all the way through to illustrate how it is utilized in the courtroom. [The book is in three sections,] with each chapter building on the previous one using a pedagogical format. The first explains the history and theory of fingerprint analysis, fingerprint patterns and classification, and the concept of biometrics […] The second section discusses forensic light sources and physical and chemical processing methods. Section three covers fingerprint analysis with chapters on documentation, crime scene processing, fingerprint and palm print comparisons, and courtroom testimony …[New to this edition are] such topics as the biometrics and AFIS systems, new and emerging chemical reagents, and more” (Publisher). Illustrated throughout with high resolution photographs. Appendices include procedural diagrams, potential hazards of the chemicals mentioned, and model testimony.

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