All posts by Ann

Afternoon Librarian, Liaison for School of Public Affairs & Social Services and School of Advanced Manufacturing , Engineering & Applied Technology

November’s Commemorations

The month of November seems especially rich in historical commemorations, starting on November 1st when Christians celebrate All Saints Day. Guy Fawkes Day on November 5th recalls England’s struggle for religious freedom, and November 19th is the anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address during the American Civil War. During this month we honor our Native American heritage, especially on Thanksgiving; hold elections; and honor our veterans. The Library of Congress has many resources for students of all ages to explore these topics.

A newly digitized collection of 14 historical newspapers published in Native communities is gathered in the database Chronicling America. These range from coast to coast and cover nearly a century: 1828 to 1922. Many include transcriptions in Native languages along with English language articles that reveal the points of view and concerns of their communities. Try reading the Cherokee writing that Sequoya invented!

Veterans’ Day was originally Armistice Day, celebrating the end of the Great War, which later became known as World War I. November 11th, 2018 will mark 100 years since the cessation of hostilities.  Several divisions of the Library of Congress have contributed short introductions highlighting items from their collections relevant to this occasion.

One of the most moving eulogies to veterans is President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. View an autograph manuscript copy from the Library of Congress collections.

We have books on all these topics available for checkout. This month we are displaying children’s books on Native American heritage and Thanksgiving. As you enter the library, look over our showcase of Agriculture resources in the hallway. We hope to see you soon!

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Black Poetry Day

October 17th is Black Poetry Day, a celebration of the voices of African-American poets.

 

 

100BestThis date was chosen to honor Jupiter Hammon, the first African-American to have a poem published (in 1760): he was born on this day. You can find more literary milestones in the encyclopedia Black Firsts.

 

 

AAPoets In 1773 an entire book of poems by Phillis Wheatley was published in Philadelphia – a reprint of the edition she had published in London. You can read the second American edition online from our Ebooks collection. Wheatley was a celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic, but died young.

 

 

Tupac We have quite a few books, ebooks, and audio books of poetry by African-American authors.  Here is a list from our catalog to start off with.

 

 

WordsWings Several of our books are for children, and some are song lyrics. My favorite way to absorb a poem is to listen to it read, or read it aloud myself. What is yours?

 

 

Manufacturing Week, October 1st-5th

Industrial Building Factory Icons Set. Simple Illustration Of 16

Your United States Census Bureau is celebrating Manufacturing Week! On their website they are showcasing lots of great infographics and the data products they offer to support manufacturing research and development.

Manufacturers contribute the data, so this is a very cool kind of ROI. It is all free, open-access, and will be of interest to anyone working in or studying this sector.

Did you know Indiana, Iowa, and Wisconsin have the highest percentage of employees in the manufacturing sector? Did you know that manufacturing contributes 6 of every 10 U.S. export dollars?

Read more …

What are digital humanities? Find out at THATCamp!

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The Humanities And Technology = THATCamp

We are participating in THATCamp Midwest @ Purdue University Fort Wayne. It will take place Friday October 5th from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., followed by optional discussion time. THATCamp Midwest @ Purdue Fort Wayne will function a bit differently than the usual THATCamp as there will be more focus on learning about digital humanities, which means we will have more structure and pre-scheduled sessions. It is perfect for faculty, staff, and students wishing to move into this field.

The day will include brief presentations, panel discussions, and workshops covering topics including: metadata tagging, social networking and data visualization, digital collections, digital project management, animation, augmented reality, and incorporating digital projects in classes/programs. A preliminary schedule is posted here on the website, where you can also register to attend. We hope to see you there!

Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for the Eastern United States

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The Guide to Creating a Sustainable Landscape

Call number: QK 115 .D68 2018  View Record in IvyCat

The organization of this book is praised as uniquely useful; your reviewer agrees! While providing a wealth of details based on extensive trials and natural settings, the entries in this guide allow for at-a-glance assessment of species. Sustainable landscaping is a hot topic, and this book will assist professionals or amateurs to choose major plantings with confidence. Includes sources and index.

How to Roast Everything

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A Game-Changing Guide to Building Flavor in Meat, Vegetables, and More. 

Call number: TX 690 .H69 2018  View record in IvyCat

“The first cookbook devoted to the art and science of roasting from America’s Test Kitchen, pulling together decades of test kitchen experience and knowledge in one place” (publisher). Designed as a master class in roasting, each of the 175+ recipes includes a “Why this recipe works” feature explaining the cooking process. Wholesale cuts of meat and their attributes are explained, along with safe handling and storage practices. An extensive section on roasting vegetables and fruits is included, and many dressings as well. A chapter on using charcoal or gas grills extends the versatility of this book. Includes metric conversions and index.

New Applied Science books: on Teaching STEM, Energy, and Wildfires

 

Teaching and learning STEM: A practical guide

1118925815By Richard M. Felder and Rebecca Brent; foreword by Barbara Oakley.
Call number: Q181 .F45 2016
View Record in IvyCat

Part of our Faculty Development Collection. The authors each have taught STEM for decades and supervised junior faculty development. Their strategies “don’t require revolutionary time-intensive changes in your teaching, but rather a gradual integration of traditional and new methods.” This book is realistic, and its insights resonate with the lived experience of teaching, particularly when discussing the different cognitive styles, learning needs, and educational backgrounds that college teachers must meet. Especially valuable are their suggestions for using technology in hybrid courses and flipped classrooms, and for assignments that develop crucial work-place skills in students: self-directed learning & problem solving, critical and creative thinking, high-performance teamwork, and communication skills.

Energy: A Human History

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By Richard Rhodes.
Call number: TJ163.2 .R56 2018
View record in IvyCat.

Relevant to our Agriculture, Engineering Technology, and Homeland Security/Public Safety programs, this book is also of broader interest. It is written for a general audience but is extensively footnoted and has a 50-page bibliography; it also contains many useful diagrams and primary sources. Richard Rhodes – winner of the Pulitzer Prize and many other awards for his science writing – “highlights the successes and failures that led to each breakthrough in energy production: from animal and waterpower to the steam engine, from internal combustion to electricity and the harnessing of wind and sunlight … Each invention, each discovery, each adaptation brought further challenges in its wake … this half-forgotten knowledge can inform our way tomorrow” (publisher).

Firestorm: How wildfire will shape our future

9781610918183
By Edward Struzik.
Call number: SD421.34.N67 S77 2017
View record in IvyCat.

Relevant to our Agriculture and Homeland Security/Public Safety programs, and for argumentative writing on social issues. “Journalist Edward Struzik visits scorched earth from Alaska to Maine, and introduces the scientists, firefighters, and resource managers making the case for a radically different approach to managing wildfire in the 21st century. Wildfires can no longer be treated as avoidable events because the risk and dangers are becoming too great and costly. Struzik weaves a heart-pumping narrative of science, economics, politics, and human determination and points to the ways that we, and the wilder inhabitants of the forests around our cities and towns, might yet flourish in an age of growing megafires.” (publisher)