All posts by Ann

Librarian, Liaison for School of Public Affairs & Social Services and School of Advanced Manufacturing , Engineering & Applied Technology

Scholarship is a Conversation – What will You say?

citations-display-board.jpg

The concept of scholarship as a conversation reflects the origins of learned societies and their journals. Many journals still in existence – such as Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society – began as correspondence between researchers working on similar topics. For example, the circles of Samuel Hartlib and Henry Oldenburg sent such letters to each other; both are associated with the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge (its full name), the oldest scientific society in the world. (Encyclopedia Britannica has excellent articles with sources on both these gentlemen and the Society.)

The Association of College & Research Libraries includes “Scholarship As Conversation” in its Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. The framework, meant to be open to instantiation in different contexts, emphasizes citations as representing this conversation.

Citations help researchers to find more research, as when you find an article that was cited in another article or book or website. That sense of being “on the trail” of an idea is one of the joys of research. Even more exciting is when you formulate your own point of view on a topic, built on information others have provided. You cite their work, and your own work stands out as your original contribution. You have the last word in the conversation!

Formatting citations is not easy, and you may wonder why they are done the way they are? Again, the styles have origins in the communities of scholars that formed around particular topics. Scientists want to know how recent a publication is before reading it; also scientific reports often have multiple authors, all of whose names need to index. Thus it makes sense that the APA citation format doesn’t spell out author first names, and puts the date of publication right after them. 

The library has many tools to help you with citing your sources: check out our current display board for ideas. Our online Guide gathers citations aids in many formats. If you prefer in-person help, bring your citation questions to the librarians: we are here to assist you! 

Once upon a time, it was a dark and stormy night … perfect for exploring our Children’s Collections

ECED display board

Did you know your library has a large collection of children’s books and storytelling props like puppets & felt boards? Plus, we have step-stools for reaching the top shelves and big bean bag chairs to curl up and read in. Children accompanying their parents to the library are welcome to read our books.

Our children’s collections support Ivy Tech Fort Wayne’s programs in Education. They also grew out of the Family Reading Center in the old library.

In addition to stories, we have children’s books on every topic – including activities in science, math, music, and art. We have books about holidays from many cultural traditions, plus DVDs and music CDs. And we subscribe to the Junior Library Guild which sends us new books each month! You can see a list and follow updates to the collection on our blog using this link.

We also have books for grown-ups about teaching kids and young adults. From the library website, you can access databases of professional literature in education research, and ebooks on education topics.

Our librarian Liz Metz has created research guides to children’s literature, and to education resources. She also made our online catalog of puppets. Liz has a degree in elementary education and is our liaison for the education programs here. You can read more about her background in this profile.

domestic terrorism resource

American Swastika: Inside the White Power Movement’s Hidden Spaces of Hate. Second edition.

By Pete Simi & Robert Futrell
Call Number: E 184 .A1 S599 2015
View in IvyCat

This book is one of few empirical research studies of the white power movement in the United States. It is based on interviews and fieldwork carried out over two decades, from 1994-2014. The authors have carefully situated their study in our contemporary social context, and rewritten extensive sections for the second edition.

To begin with, they clearly define “the white power movement” to encompass various manifestations of belief that “the white race” is genetically superior to all other humans (p. 3). A great value of this book lies in its examination of social dynamics that have allowed these ideas to survive in the face of mainstream condemnation and scientific debunking: economic factors, niche music scenes, online forums, and personal networks including church groups.

This book is included in all major bibliographies of domestic terrorism prevention, and is relevant to our programs in public safety, homeland security, and sociology. It is important reading for anyone concerned about how hate groups maintain a presence in our society.

Beautiful News

Looking for an uplift to combat the depressing effects of shorter days and colder temps? Each day the website Information is Beautiful posts an infographic about an uplifting fact on their blog Beautiful News.

I’ve linked to the Health section here, but there are many others to explore. You may not agree with their perspective on every topic, but there is more than enough good news posted here to go around. So take a look, and share!

The graphics are all free to use according to their Creative Commons license, clearly marked. They will be useful for class presentations in many of our curricula.

(I’ve previously mentioned David McCandless, the founder of Information is Beautiful, in a post about data visualization)

National Book Festival 2019 Videos released

The Library of Congress is currently rolling out videos from author talks at the 2019 National Book Festival. This annual event is sponsored by the Library of Congress and takes place in Washington, D.C. at the end of August. (It is much more comfortable to view these talks online – August in D.C. is truly swampy!)

This year, there are many wonderful videos from the Science stage reporting current research, as well as popular writers on history, politics, biography, and of course fiction and poetry and children’s books. We have books by most of these authors in our collection.

Click on this link to access the list of videos. The easiest way to browse the list is to click on Sort by Title to see author names interfiled with titles.

Image showing how to sort the list by title

National First-Generation College Celebration, Nov. 8th

Library display about first generation college students

All this week we are celebrating first-generation college graduates. This includes many of our Ivy Tech staff, and graduates.

We have a display of selected books by famous first-gens, including neurosurgeon Ben Carson, First Lady Michelle Obama, Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Clarence Thomas, General Colin Powell, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. The books are already getting checked out, so come take a look soon!

The most recent data available (from 2016) shows that 24% of all college students are first-generation. At community colleges, the percentage is 64%. Data also shows that while most first-generation students get financial aid, they do not partake of other college services like academic support and counseling at the same rates as other students (US Dept. of Education). As these helps are often crucial to success in college, this gap is concerning.

College is a new culture, no matter how academically prepared one is. We are having some fun with this by asking people to write down words or phrases that they had to learn – or learn a new meaning of – when they started college. My favorite is “citation”! (I’m sorry, Officer …)

What are some college words you had to learn? Leave a comment here, or come in to the library and help us out with this.

All Hallows Read

Spooky Books our Staff Love

All Hallows Read is a world-wide event celebrating the delights of sharing scary stories. It coincides with Hallowe’en. Being spooked can be fun when you have someone to hold on to!

In the Library this month we are displaying books in a range of scary genres – mysteries, horror, gothic, crime – for you to check out. Our staff have some specific recommendations below.

So grab a book, grab a friend, and turn on your reading light in a darkened room …

Dracula by Bram Stoker. View Record in IvyCat

Ann Spinney recommends this because while the story is scary, Stoker’s descriptive passages of moonlight on mountains and other natural scenes are ravishing. It is all very much in the Romantic era style. We also have the Illustrated Junior Library edition of this classic in our collection.

The Skeleton Haunts a House. A Family Skeleton Mystery, Book 3. By Leigh Perry. View Free Kindle Preview

Diana Dudley recommends this one. Sid the Skeleton lives with the family of an adjunct professor. No one knows how he came alive again, but now that he is re-animated, he takes an interest in solving the mysterious deaths of others. On a visit (in costume, of course) to a Halloween Haunted House with his family, Sid is accidentally trapped inside when the police close the place down to investigate an actual dead body. Sid does some investigating of his own.

Diana also recommends Joyland and Duma Key by Stephen King – “they are not too spooky.”

Coraline by Neil Gaiman View Record in IvyCat

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. View Record in IvyCat

Liz Metz recommends these two young adult fantasy books by the masterful Neil Gaiman. They are in our Juvenile Fiction collection.

UnSub and Into the Black Nowhere by Meg Gardiner. View record for UnSub in IvyCat

Nicole Treesh writes, “The spookiest books I’ve enjoyed recently are crime thrillers by Meg Gardiner – UnSub books 1 and 2. The first, UnSub, is inspired by the real Zodiac Killer. It follows ‘a young detective determined to apprehend the serial murderer who destroyed her family and terrorized a city twenty years earlier’ (book jacket). It is in our fiction collection. The second, Into the Black Nowhere, is based on the real-life case of Ted Bundy, ‘an exhilarating thriller in which FBI profiler Caitlin Hendrix faces off against a charming, merciless serial killer’ (book jacket). It is in our Baker & Taylor fiction collection.”