All posts by Ann

Afternoon Librarian, Liaison for School of Public Affairs & Social Services and School of Advanced Manufacturing , Engineering & Applied Technology

How to Save Your Ebook Central Bookshelf

On June 19th, your Ivy Tech access to Ebook Central will change.

If you use the Bookshelf feature, your books will not be saved. You must download the list of books on your Bookshelf before the change, and then restock your shelves (so to speak).

It’s easy to download a bibliography. If you have not used the feature before, follow these steps:

Open Ebook Central, Sign in, and go to your Bookshelf. Select a folder to open it.

At the top, click Select All to select all the books in this folder. At the very top, click the giant quotes icon to Cite Folder

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The following dialog box will open

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Click the Export button and save the .txt file where you want it. You can change its name – the default is “citations” – but leave it as a .txt file for best results.

Now go to where you saved it, right click on it, and choose Open With Word 2016.

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Your document will look like this, with each book citation in a paragraph flush left. (It’s not perfect, there is not a line space between two of my citations; but usable for the purpose.)

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June is Great Outdoors month

Gene Stratton-Porter Arbor, Rome City, IN. Photo courtesy of Nicole Treesh

Before you head outdoors, come into the Library and check out our resources for outdoor recreation, outdoor research, and outdoor careers. We have suggestions for all ages and interests:

  • Outdoor activities for kids in Fort Wayne City
  • Guides to Indiana State Parks, and National Parks
  • Wildlife and woodlot management
  • River, lakes, and wetlands ecology

Did you know that public parks are the sites of many, and various, research projects? Check out our showcase of articles, including studies of glaciers, slime molds, predator-prey ecology, erosion control, pest control, human behavior, health effects of outdoor recreation, and more.

You can access data from national parks by visiting the websites of the National Park Service. For photographs and other non-text artifacts, use https://museum.nps.gov For texts (research reports, teaching resources, maps, etc.) use the NPS Library website – it is clunky but has links out to all the parks.

A great new resource is the Open Parks Network. When complete, this database will link all the National Parks digitized collections; currently, representation is mostly from the southeast. Users can search in this one place to find collections of interest, rather than going to multiple websites. For example: Civil War maps from Fort Sumter, moths of Congaree National Park, political memorabilia from the Jimmy Carter National Historic site. Also linked are research reports by national parks staff.

Remember, our databases can be accessed 24/7/365 so you can take your reading with you to the beach, woods, or Indiana State Parks.

Books can be checked out when the library is open. Our summer semester hours are:

  • Mondays-Thursdays 7:45 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.
  • Fridays 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.

See you on the trails!

Pepper, an elderly Cairn Terrier, enjoys the River Greenway. Photo by Ann Spinney.

Celebrating Books, Copyright, and Intellectual Property Rights

April is the coolest month – for librarians! We celebrate National Library Week April 7th-13th, World Book and Copyright Day on April 23rd, and World Intellectual Property Day on April 26th.

You can still add to #MyLibraryMyStory on Twitter, and join the thousands that have been blogging all month. Or just read the great tweets already posted!

What’s the difference between copyright and an intellectual property claim? Intellectual property is the broadest, including copyrights, patents, and trademarks. These are then distinguished by the medium. If your idea is fixed in an image or text – like this page whether online or printed out – you can claim a copyright. If your idea is an invention for a machine or process, you can get a patent. If it is a slogan or logo distinguishing the origin of goods or services, you can claim a trademark. More information is at the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Stop in and see our display on different kinds of intellectual property rights claims, how they contribute to our economy, and how to avoid violating them.

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National Kindergarten Day

National Kindergarten Day occurred this year on Sunday, April 21st. Our student worker Kayti created this attractive and informative display that we have been enjoying for a couple of weeks already. As she says, “Celebrate by grabbing a book to read or teaching a child something new!” All the books, puppets, and music on the display may be checked out.

Did you ever wonder why it is called Kindergarten – a German word? It’s origins are in Europe in the 1770s. The German educator Friedrich Froebel coined the name Kindergarten for a pre-school in which children (Kinder) would achieve self-understanding through playing with each other, and grow like plants in a garden (Garten).

 

National Poetry Month at the Library

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We are celebrating National Poetry Month with our annual poetry contest, Ink Cloud. Entries of original poetry and artwork are due by April 19th.

This year we are sponsoring an open mic poetry reading featuring the contest winners, on April 25th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Anthony Commons. You can participate by reading a favorite poem – written by you or someone else! Or just listen to others read.

To inspire you, we are displaying books from our poetry collection. (There is more in our online ebook collections, and in these journals.)

Meet David Rudny Winn, who coordinates our Poetry contest and offers us general  literary guidance.

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What do you do at the Library?

I am the clerk at the library desk every weekday morning.  I’m there to help you check out books, navigate library resources, and assist with using our technology.  I also help with some research questions that aren’t involved enough to need a librarian’s assistance.

In addition to running the annual Ink Cloud Poetry Contest, I process and curate the library’s Baker and Taylor book collection, which are popular new books that we lease for a limited time.  This collection can include anything from the latest popular thriller to a must-read memoir, up-and-coming YA fiction or even graphic novels. [Editor’s note: we are thrilled by the selections David captures for us. Our wait lists are not long, either!]

How did you gain your expertise?

I received my B.A. in English from the University of St. Francis in 2012.  I have been employed at the Allen County Public Library since 2012 and here at Ivy Tech since 2014.

Please tell us a little about your personal life.

I live on the south side of Fort Wayne with my wife Alex.  We have been together for seven years and married for two.  I play bass and share vocals in the grunge/hard rock band Withered Veins. We are just finishing up our first EP, and we’d love to see you in the crowd as we play shows around the area.

What is a favorite book you would recommend?

The Road by Cormac McCarthy is a book that will leave you feeling exhausted, but it is well worth reading.  While post-apocalyptic stories are more popular than ever, the core of the father-son relationship and the relentless bleakness of this tale makes it something uniquely potent, especially when delivered in McCarthy’s terse, but hauntingly beautiful style.

What is a favorite website you would recommend?

If you’re looking to waste some time dipping into the weird, you can’t go wrong with Atlas Obscura. It’s a collection of short articles detailing the weird and wonderful from around the world that can also function as a travel guide if you’re looking for something off the beaten path.

New Criminal Justice and Public Safety books

The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement

By Andrew Guthrie Ferguson.

Call Number: HV 8141 .F47 2017

View in IvyCat

Winner of the 2018 Law & Legal Studies PROSE Award. “In this first book on big data policing, Ferguson offers an examination of how new technologies will alter the who, where, when and how we police.  These new technologies … offer data-driven methods to improve police accountability and to remedy the underlying socio-economic risk factors that encourage crime. The Rise of Big Data Policing is a must read for anyone concerned with how technology will revolutionize law enforcement and its potential threat to the security, privacy, and constitutional rights of citizens” (Publisher). The author thoroughly considers the pros and cons of data-driven policing for law enforcement and security personnel as well as the communities they serve. The book includes extensive bibliographical notes and an index.

Profiling and Criminal Justice in America: A Reference Handbook, second edition. Contemporary World Issues: Criminal Justice

By Jeff Bumgarner

Call Number: HV 9950 .B86 2015

View in IvyCat

“Addressing this highly controversial topic holistically, the book considers questions such as whether the criminal justice system in the United States unfairly targets minorities, how the rights of minorities can be protected while enabling law enforcement to use every resource available, and whether justification for profiling techniques exists. This work will serve students at the high school and college level as well as general readers who are interested in criminal justice issues and issues relating to equality and fairness before the bar of justice.” Section 1 provides a brief philosophical background and history of profiling as a peacekeeping technique, focusing on American historical contexts, with common profile types. Sections 2 and 3 cover problems, controversies, and solutions with perspectives essays from stakeholders on all sides. Section 4 is an encyclopedia of people who have influenced profiling theory and practice. Section 5 is an annotated bibliography of government documents including key Supreme Court case decisions. Section 6 Resources is an extensive annotated bibliography of other research sources. A Chronology, Glossary, and Index complete the book.

Forensic Toxicology: Medico-Legal Case Studies

By Kalipatnapu N. Rao.

Call Number: RA 1228 .R36 2012

View in IvyCat

This book “demonstrates how the science of forensic toxicology acts as a bridge between medicine and law. Tracking the progression of toxicology findings from the laboratory to the courtroom, it prepares practicing toxicologists to write reports and testify at depositions and in court” using actual case studies. Rao explains the organization of clinical laboratories, with sections on accreditation, quality control, and method validation. Situations that toxicologists most often confront are discussed in detail, along with some unusual and rare cases useful for in-class discussion. The book is written in remarkably accessible language and is very clearly organized to pack a great deal of information into short chapters. Each chapter has full references, and the cumulative index is extensive.

Practical Bomb Scene Investigation, Third edition. Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations Series

By James T. Thurman

Call Number: HV 8097 .B62 T47 2017

View in IvyCat

Focused on the forensic examination of explosions, this book provides step-by-step procedures for managing and processing a bomb scene. It is written in accessible language and extensively illustrated with photographs, diagrams, and charts. Chapters cover explosion theory and dynamics, identification of explosives, device components, collection of evidence, WMDs, and military ordnance. Discussion of work in the forensic laboratory includes “reading the bomber’s signature” with DNA evidence, latent prints, tool marks, and other analytical perspectives. The final chapter is on managing tactical postblast investigations – in scenes that are not secure. Each chapter includes a summary, review questions, and bibliography. There is a cumulative index, glossary, and 17 appendices.

Active Shooter: Preparing for and Responding to a Growing Threat

By Kevin T. Doss and C. David Shepherd

Call Number: HV 6529 .D67 2015

View in IvyCat

Authors Doss and Shepherd “have mined their extensive experience in government and private security to provide the tools necessary to identify potential violent individuals, along with the responses needed to save lives, reduce corporate liability, and recover from an active shooter event.” This books covers all stages, with checklists for better screening in the hiring process to prevent such events, blueprints for planning the corporate response during an event, communication structures with first responders, and managing employees, media coverage, and customers in the aftermath of an event. It is aimed at the private sector but will be useful for anyone with responsibility for providing or overseeing the security of a workplace. Each chapter has references, and there is a cumulative index. Appendices deal with the psychological profiles and classification of murderers, case studies of active shooter events, and discussion exercises for training teams.

Crime Scene Investigations Series

We have 12 new or updated books in this series from Greenhaven Press. These are short topic overviews written at a high-school level, useful for anyone seeking a quick introduction and summary. All draw on real-life cases and interviews with the victims, detectives, and technicians involved, as well as outside experts. They are thoroughly illustrated and include statistics. Each book uses scholarly references and has a bibliography for further reading.

Our new titles (with call numbers) are:

The Homicide Detective (HV 8079 .H6 A46 2009) View in IvyCat

Cold Cases (HV 6515 .S759 2011) View in IvyCat

Identity Theft in the 21st Century (HV 6675 .M263 2018) View in IvyCat

DNA Evidence: The Proof is in the Genes (RA 1057.55 .J46 2018) View in IvyCat

Undercover Operations: Investigating Crimes from the Inside (HV 8080 .U5 M396 2018) View in IvyCat

Drug Trafficking: A Global Criminal Trade (HV 5801 .H687 2018) View in IvyCat

Tracking Serial Killers (HV 8079 .H6 Y35 2018) View in IvyCat

Criminal Profiling: Searching for Suspects (HV 8073.5 .H66 2018) View in IvyCat

Clues in Corpses: A Closer Look at Body Farms (GN 69.8 .W38 2018) View in IvyCat

Ballistics: The Science of Weapons at Work (HV 8077 .S28 2018) View in IvyCat

Missing Persons: What Happens When Someone Disappears (HV 6762 .A3 V56 2018) View in IvyCat

Cybercrime: Using Computers as Weapons (HV 6773 .S395 2017) View in IvyCat

Never Home Alone

97815416457451From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live

By Rob Dunn

Call Number: QH309 .D866 2018

View in IvyCat

Just in time for mud season, we have acquired this best-selling science book. It is a fun read, and contains relevant information for our agriculture, biology, building construction, culinary, health sciences, and HVAC-R programs. Rob Dunn is a rigorous scientist who writes in an engaging style about his research, revealing how simple curiosity can advance knowledge. There are so many astonishing facts in this “natural history of where we live,” that readers will be transported back to a childlike appreciation for creepy-crawlies. Dunn also walks  through the history of microbiology as he investigates water pipes, air systems, construction materials, kitchens, and the bodies of humans and their pets. There is a good dose of social history, too, as he considers how science has changed the way we live – not always for the better. His frank admission of what biologists don’t know yet will inspire budding scientists.