Category Archives: Databases

Light up December

Welcome to December, the darkest month of the year in the northern hemisphere. It’s not surprising that all cultures and traditions in this area have celebrations involving lights or fires and feasting. We have displays of cookbooks from our extensive collection that you can check out for your holiday cooking.

Our December graduates will surely shine brightly on all around them. We wish them all the best as they leave us. Special thanks to our wonderful library student assistant Cassondra.

New Products in the Library include the Testing and Education Reference Center database. It has practice entrance exam questions for public safety jobs, for Accounting certification, Teacher Praxis exams, the GED, SAT, CLEP, LSAT, and many more. Also included are tools for assessing career choices, writing your resume, and interviewing.

GFCLearnFree is a resource that we’d like to reintroduce. This portal contains hundreds of free training tools for students and really any adult trying to function in the USA. Improve your computer keyboarding and mousing, understand how Excel spreadsheets work, get an overview of using social media tools, reading a transit map, and so much more.

Celebrate October

October feels like a month of holidays! This year October encompasses Sukkot, Diwali, and Samhain/Hallowe’en among others. We have cookbooks with recipes for these holidays, and children’s books about them too. Come on in and browse!

As the leaves fall, you can use the online TreeFinder to identify the tree species they are from. And of course you can find many uses for colorful leaves, and leaf-themed designs, in our Hobbies and Crafts Reference Center.

Don’t forget to observe All Hallows Read by giving someone you love a scary book that they would like. Our new favorite for children is I Want to Be in a Scary Story. Check it out!

Other new books received this month include:
The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the Unlikely Heroine Who Outwitted America’s Enemies, by Jason Fagone.
George and Lizzie by Nancy Pearl, the acclaimed debut novel by NPR books commentator.
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, a young adult novel of which Kirkus Reviews says: “This story is necessary. This story is important.”
Sleeping Beauties, another novel with topical overtones, from horror master Steven King and his son Owen King.

Meet Your Library Staff
There is no better illustration of talent hiding behind a job description than Library Director Nicole Treesh. (That’s her on the left)

What do you do at the Library?
I have been the Library Director for almost a year.  The synopsis of what I do is oversee the Fort Wayne, Wabash, and now Warsaw library services, resources, and staff while supporting the mission and goals of the College particularly related to student success.  I can’t do what I do without the amazing staff on my team.  I represent the library on several committees and consortia including the Statewide Library Director’s Committee, our Regional Academic Affairs Team, and the Regional Extended Cabinet.
I develop, manage, and evaluate the library budgets, the library collections, and our online resources.  My brain is always working, thinking, and learning about trends in information technology, library services, and community college completion and retention.  I’m always striving to tell the story of the library and our mission to serve the students, faculty, and staff in more ways than just offering books and resources.

How did you gain your expertise?
I have a BS in Counseling and worked several years in community mental health organizations.  My passion for wanting to help people overcome adversity and obtain their goals in life started when I was in elementary school.  I’ve also always loved libraries, books, and technology.  I got a part time job at a library and quickly realized that my passions for helping people and information technology go hand in hand.  I decided to get my MLS and started pursuing full time library jobs.  I spent a couple years working in secondary schools in both IT, media centers, and as a Computer Programming Teacher.  My first MLS job was as a librarian here at Ivy Tech!  Soon after I started, the library director resigned and I became interim director until hired officially in November 2016.  My library career path isn’t traditional and certainly moved rapidly, but I couldn’t be happier or feel more blessed.

What is unique about you that could be of service to the Ivy Tech Community?
I believe that my background in mental health is invaluable, but also my personal experience with mental illness particularly as it relates to suicide prevention and awareness having lost my dad to suicide when I was just 17.  I’m compassionate and empathetic, can relate to the struggles of many of our students, and have the strength to move mountains for our students to succeed.

What is your favorite thing to do outside the Library?
I should say reading, right?  But truthfully, I’m a Netflix addict.  I love gardening, spending time with my husband, my kitty Maggie, and family.  I also dance obnoxiously to Kelly Clarkson 24/7 who I’ve seen 4 times in concert.

What books would you recommend to readers?
The Watersong series by Amanda Hocking who is a terrific YA author, I also have loved anything by Jandy Nelson, Jodi Picoult, or Ellen DeGeneres who is my favorite person/philanthropist.

What website do you recommend just for fun?
Everyone needs a goodreads.com account!

Welcome to Fall Semester at Ivy Tech Northeast!

Over the summer we made some changes to our library website in order to serve you better

Let us know what you think!

From our homepage, when you click on the Articles link in the left navigation panel, you will now find the databases grouped by subject.

We have maintained the A-Z List which is alphabetical by title.

Instructors: We have changed a few of our database subscriptions, so please check on the resources available for your assignments. We encourage the use of Guides to point students to appropriate resources, whether databases, websites, or whatever. A Librarian will be delighted to set one up for your courses and sections. These can be linked to your IvyLearn course site too.

Requesting library instruction for your class is quicker and easier. Use the Schedule Instruction link on the left navigation panel and fill out the form, which is so self-explanatory that faculty are already using it. (A detailed mailing on this new system is being distributed.)

Students: Reserving the study rooms is now Self-Service! Use the Reserve Rooms link on the left navigation panel of the Library Home page. You can do this remotely on any device, or come in and use the kiosk at the front desk where our friendly staff will show you how.

Everyone: Check out our new Apps for College guide, which has collected the best mobile device apps especially useful to students and teachers.

Come on in and peruse our book display this month, which relates to the solar eclipse. You can check these books out, along with #1 NY Times Bestseller, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by the always-entertaining Neil de Grasse Tyson in our Baker & Taylor collection.

It’s not necessary to memorize all the numbers he throws around to understand the principles he explains. You will feel smarter just carrying this around!

New books we have received:

Behold the Dreamers “A compulsively readable debut novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream—the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy”
New York Times Bestseller – Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award – Longlisted for the PEN/Open Book Award – An ALA Notable Book

Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult “An irresistible, nostalgic, insightful—and totally original—ramble through classic children’s literature from Vanity Fair contributing editor (and father) Bruce Handy.”

The Driver “From the creator of the TV show Bones comes a ‘riveting, smart and funny’ (Harlan Coben) debut thriller. ‘Everything a great thriller should be—always smart, often funny, and relentlessly exciting. I loved every page.’ (Scott Turow)”

Coming soon:

The Burning Girl “A bracing, hypnotic coming-of-age story about the bond of best friends, from the New York Times best-selling author of The Emperor’s Children.”

Stay with Me “This celebrated, unforgettable first novel, shortlisted for the prestigious Bailey’s Prize and set in Nigeria, gives voice to both husband and wife as they tell the story of their marriage—and the forces that threaten to tear it apart.”

You can place holds on these books if they are not available using your IvyTech library account.

Best wishes to everyone for a successful semester!

In the steamy days of late summer, think of STEAM … and Steampunk

Ivy Tech takes another interim break in August, just before kids return to school. When the weather is hot and stormy, is a great time to indulge in crafting and hobbies.

Research shows these activities are good for your brain:
“Having at least one persistent and intellectually stimulating hobby is a better predictor of career success in any discipline than IQ, standardized test scores, or grades.”1
“Nobel laureates were: twenty-five times as likely as an average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be an artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other craft; four times as likely to be a musician; and twice as likely to be a photographer.”2

Educators know that the arts are a crucial addition to math, science, engineering and technology training. The non-linear problem-solving techniques, and creative flow, exercised in artistic endeavors stimulate innovation.

Crochet and knitting are used by mathematicians to demonstrate hyperbolic surfaces. Dr. Daina Taimina, visiting professor at Cornell University, was one of the pioneers in demonstrating hyperbolic crochet. Dr. Sarah-Marie Belcastro at Smith College and Dr. Carolyn Yackel at Mercer University publish on mathematical knitting. Dr. Maryam Mirzakhani, the Fields Medal winner who died of cancer July 14th, also worked on complex surfaces by “doodling” on large sheets of paper, writing the mathematical formulas in the margins.3

Margaret Wertheim explains the math of coral reefs using crocheted models from Dr. Taimina in a TED talk.

To get your creativity flowing, we have books to check out and page through on our DIY shelf in the Creative Commons. These are for all ages, and there are more crafting books in our children’s section.

We have access to the Hobbies and Crafts Reference Center as part of our databases subscription. This is an excellent resource for techniques tutorials and designs, linking to how-to instructions and creative ideas with full text and illustrations from periodicals and books. It is organized into broad categories you can browse: Arts & Crafts, Collecting, Home & Garden, Indoor Recreation [games], Kids’ Crafts, Model Building, Needlecrafts & Textiles, Outdoor Recreation, Performing Arts, Science & Technology, Scrapbooking & Paper Crafts. A keyword search will pull up periodicals and books on “cake decoration” and other such specific activities within these. Or, you can do a keyword search across all categories for style topics, like Cosplay or Steampunk. Both are well covered here, from clothing to cakes to household furnishings.

1 Milgram, R., and Hong, E. (1997). “Out-of-school activities in gifted adolescents as a predictor of vocational choice and work.” Journal Of Secondary Gifted Education 8/3:111. Quoted in Colegrove, T. (2017). “Editorial Board Thoughts: Arts into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – STEAM, Creative Abrasion, and the Opportunity in Libraries Today,” Information Technology and Libraries, 36/1:7. https://doi.org/10.6017/ital.v36i1.9733

2 Root-Bernstein, et al. (2008). “Arts Foster Scientific Success: Avocations of Nobel, National Academy, Royal Society, and Sigma Xi Members.” Journal of Psychology of Science and Technology https://doi.org/10.1891/1939-7054.1.2.51; quoted in Colegrove 2017.

3 http://news.stanford.edu/2017/07/15/maryam-mirzakhani-stanford-mathematician-and-fields-medal-winner-dies/

Happy Birthday USA!

The flag that inspired “The Star-Spangled Banner” (image from the Smithsonian Institution

 

While fireworks explode as we celebrate the Fourth of July, you can get a blast from the past with these great historical resources! Who isn’t moved by examining Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten draft of the Declaration of Independence, or reading manuscript letters of George Washington, or the reports of eyewitnesses to battles in the Revolution?
The Coming of the American Revolution is a freely accessible, online gallery from the Massachusetts Historical Society containing digitized primary source documents like broadsides and newspaper announcements of meetings of the Sons of Liberty. Documents are presented with extensive scholarly notes and resources for teachers and students. It is clearly organized and offers multiple searching options.
Examine three early versions of the Declaration of Independence in the online gallery of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. The first is Jefferson’s draft, which he sent to a friend before submitting it to the Continental Congress on July 1st, 1776.
Examine correspondence between members of the Continental Congress, digitized by The New York Public Library’s Early American Manuscripts Project. These collections include hand-written letters cross-indexed by names and topics. Keyword searching will find these tags.
Read transcribed accounts of battles from eyewitnesses and soldiers’ diaries of life in the Continental Army in the database American History Online accessible through the Ivy Tech Northeast Library home page. Find it in the A-Z list of databases. From the American History Home page, under “Browse Resources” choose “Primary Sources,” then under “Filter Primary Sources” choose “American Revolution” to see an index of transcriptions. This database also has maps of major battles in the War of Independence. From the Home page, under “Browse Resources” choose “Maps and Charts”, then under “Filter Maps and Charts” choose “American Revolution.”
What was life like in the Federal period after the Revolution? Check out the open database Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Papers from 1789-1924 are keyword-searchable. 1876 was the centennial year of the United States. To see newspaper articles about the celebrations, do an advanced searchof all states for the phrase centennial anniversary or centennial celebration. Choose the date range 1870-1880 for articles about the preparation and aftermath. This is an ongoing project of the National Endowment for the Humanities, coordinated by the Library of Congress. Content is being contributed by local institutions, digitized in a format suitable for keyword searching. This site also provides a directory of newspapers from 1690-present, showing library holdings; this is the expected range of coverage upon completion.
Are you decorating your house for the holiday? Symbols of the United States is a Primary Source Set from the Library of Congress, written for elementary schools but fun for all. View digitized original sources and read the history of the Liberty Bell, our flag, the bald eagle, Uncle Sam, the Star Spangled Banner, and the Statue of Liberty. This set includes a Teachers’ plan, a student guide, and a free ebook for iOS devices.

America’s Historical Newspapers

This year is the bi-centennial of Indiana statehood. Wouldn’t it be interesting to read newspaper accounts about the new state that were written in 1816? Now you can!

America’s Historical Newspapers is a new Library database that has PDF copies of a variety of actual newspapers from around the United States, with issues going back as far as 1690! You can read contemporary newspaper articles from the time of the American Revolution, Civil War, Roaring 20s, and much more.

America’s Historical Newspapers includes hundreds of primary sources. It fosters primary source research skills, offers a variety of perspectives to help students think critically, and facilitates the tracking of trends, issues and events. By offering original documents exactly as they appeared in print, America’s Historical Newspapers complements textbooks in social studies, English, the arts, science and other subjects.

But what if you’re more interested in recent or current news? Don’t worry, this product includes America’s News, which has web-page articles from newspapers in all fifty states. So if you want to find the news that the papers are printing, whether it’s from today or 300 years ago, go to the Library’s A-Z list and click on America’s Historical Newspapers; it has all the news that fits.

New – ScienceDirect from Elsevier

Do you need articles from scholarly, peer-reviewed journals? Do you need the latest and best research from the fields of health and life sciences, physical sciences, or social and behavioral sciences?

If so, then ScienceDirect is the place to go. ScienceDirect is a new Library database that publishes academic journals produced by Elsevier, one of the most prestigious academic publishers in the world.

ScienceDirect carries the world’s best research, including articles that are not yet available in print, and going back to 1995, from almost 1,200 journals.