Category Archives: Library News

How Are You?

While isolating ourselves for the remainder of the semester, wellness may be demanding priority in your daily routine. Among the many national observances that the library will be recognizing this month, Stress Awareness Month is particularly relevant. Home life can sometimes compound stress. Whether or not we now have time for ourselves, take time for yourself.

Here are three eBooks available to Ivy Tech students and faculty that may provide some ways of mitigating stress:

The Mindful Twenty-Something
The Age of Overwhelm
Inhale, Exhale, Repeat

More specific to the challenges we face from the ongoing pandemic, you may have noticed a number of emails from the college itself. Included were references to Ivy Tech programs like IvyCares and IvyAssist, which assist students in connecting with critical social services or other vital community resources.

HelpGuide has produced an incredibly comprehensive guide to help cope with pandemic related stress: Coronavirus Anxiety: Coping with Stress, Fear, and Uncertainty. It not only shares sound advice to help manage mental wellness but also includes crisis numbers.

Be well.

Book Review: The Outsider by Stephen King

This book is classic Stephen King. The premise is: “Can a person be 2 places at once?” WARNING: The book starts with a brutal, graphic murder of a young boy. If you can get through the first chapter you should be okay. A man who witnesses place at the murder, suddenly has credible witnesses that place him miles away. The race is on to find the killer. The tension builds, the bodies stack up, and the horror begins.

My only complaint is I think the book would be better if the editor had chopped out 50 pages. This is a long book and at times can drag. But given that, if you like Stephen King, I think you will like this book.

Earth as it is (Book Review)

“This was the burden Charlie Bader was unable to lay down: his need for softness.” In one quiet sentence, Jan Maher captures the heart of Earth As It Is, a richly layered novel about one person’s journey across time, place, and gender to find softness, community, and love.

In the hands of a lesser writer, a novel about a cross-dressing man living as a woman could become shallow and sensationalist, but not in Maher’s. Maher’s understanding and empathy for the honest complexity of individuals is a gift both to her characters and her readers.

Maher constructs her novel in such a way so that when Charlie Bader moves to Heaven, Indiana, as Charlene, readers know Charlie’s history but Heaven’s residents do not. To them, Charlene is just Charlene, the hairdresser who shampoos, cuts, and perms the hair of Heaven’s women even as she hears and holds in confidence their stories and secrets. Charlene is a woman to be trusted, and so they do, to the benefit of the whole community.

Earth As It Is reminds readers that Earth truly is as it is, woven through with heartache, longing, secrets, love, sacred trust, softness, and a desire to be in every moment one’s best and truest self.

Ink Cloud

While we all adjust to the uninvited consequences of the pandemic, please consider investing time in your creativity. Few explorations are more transformative and empowering than cultivating your art.

Submissions for the 2020 Ink Cloud publication will remain open until April 19th. Please share your original poetry with us. Original artwork for the magazine’s cover remains just as welcome.

Contingent on student and staff interest and time, the Ink Cloud Open Mic is still possible, but the venue would be moved online. Expect those specifics mid-April. In the meantime, stay safe and create.

Details: library.ivytech.edu/inkcloud
Questions or suggestions: rwierbiki@ivytech.edu

Pi à la Mode

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Every year on March Fourteenth people around the world celebrate the most famous mathematical constant: the ratio of the length of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. This is an irrational number, approximated to 3.14 (or 3.1415926) and represented by the Greek letter π. As a number, π is transcendental and real as well as irrational. Mathematician James Glaisher remarked of π that “a complete account of its calculation would almost amount to a history of mathematics.” (Quoted in: William Dunham, The Genius of Euler: Reflections on His Life and Work: On the History of Euler’s Constant (The Mathematical Association of America, 2007), p. 147.)

π has been calculated out to over a trillion decimal places, but we still do not know where it ends! Competitions to recite the known sequence of digits are held regularly around the world. (See pi-world-ranking-list.com for record-setting recitations.)

Mathematician Mark Kac noted that “pi, so intimately connected with circles, keeps cropping up in probability theory and statistics, the two disciplines which deal with randomness and luck.” (Mark Kac, Enigmas of Chance: An Autobiography: The Search for the Meaning of Independence (Harper & Row, 1985), p. 55.) We have an activity set up for you to experience this, based on Buffon’s Needle, the proof named after Georges-Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, a scientist who enjoyed gambling.

The Greek letter π is pronounced like our English word “pie” – hence the puns, since pie is usually made in a circular pan, and, being a delicious pastry, may be difficult to divide fairly, as memorialized in the old English nursery rhyme:

A was once an Apple pie; B bit it; C cut it; D dealt it; E eat it; F fought for it; G got it; H had it; I inspected it; J joined it; K kept it; L longed for it; M mourned for it; N nodded at it; O opened it; P peeped in it; Q quartered it; R ran for it; S stole it; T took it; U upset it; V viewed it; W wanted it; X, Y, Z, and ampersand, all wished for a piece in hand.

March Fourteenth is also the birthday of Albert Einstein (b. 1879), who theorized what is perhaps the most famous equation using a constant in our universe: the relationship of mass to energy, represented by E=mc2 (E=energy; m=mass; c=the speed of light).

March Fourteenth is the death anniversary of another famous physicist: Stephen Hawking (d. 2018) who developed theories about the origins of our universe, and black holes, based on Einstein’s work.

The Library is displaying books by and about Einstein and Hawking, plus books on number theory and pastries, this month.

Come on in for some Pi!

 

National Ethics Awareness Month

No matter your area of study or line of work, ethics have an effect on policies, principles, and behavior. As an official observance, National Ethics Awareness Month draws attention to how crucial the ongoing study and practice of ethical engagement is.

Modernity comes with unforeseen dilemmas that shape the way we experience the world. Ethics takes a practical approach in exploring humane and sensible solutions to otherwise unavoidable and irreconcilable problems.

Ivy Tech offers a number of classes that take exclusive looks at ethics through the lens of many different disciplines:

PHIL 102: Introduction to Ethics
LEGS 170: Legal Ethics
TMAS 120: Ethics and Massage Management
BUSN 120: Ethics and Social Responsibility
CRIM 201: Ethics in Criminal Justice
HLHS 105: Medical Law and Ethics
HUMS 220: Issues and Ethics in Human Services

More information on these classes and more can be found here: https://www.ivytech.edu/course-catalog/.

The library has also curated a small collection of our books to further showcase National Ethics Awareness Month. Please stop by to not only find which dilemmas most apply to your life but to also discover if you can contribute to their resolutions!

In honor of this month’s observance, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

What is Ink Cloud?

That relies on what you want to say!

What started as a poetry contest to celebrate National Poetry Month in April of 2015 has become an annual Ivy Tech Fort Wayne Library publication. Ink Cloud showcases the poetic and artistic talents of Ivy Tech Fort Wayne students and staff.

This year we embrace the non-competitive nature of the art of poetry by dedicating the event entirely to its contributors. A poem’s merit can speak for itself. But unlike its merit, poetry expects only one thing from you: You will share it.

Anyone who has shared their work knows that the spirit of poetry waits within its release. So share with us! If you choose to share with us, you can expect to be included in 2020’s publication of Ink Cloud. Then join us and your fellow Ivy Tech poets at the Ink Cloud Poetry Reading to listen and be heard!

Find the details here: https://library.ivytech.edu/inkcloud!

In addition to poetry, participants may submit original artwork to be considered for the Ink Cloud cover. We are also looking for talented graphic designers to reimagine the Ink Cloud logo.