Category Archives: Library News

Constitution day September 17th

Celebrate Constitution Day by spending some time with the document that grants US citizens their rights and privileges. An annotated online version is available from Congress.gov that aims to increase understanding of the Constitution and how it affects our society.

Constitution Annotated allows users to browse through all the Articles and Amendments, providing links to Supreme Court decisions based on each. Users can also perform topic searches and find all the passages in the Articles and Amendments and the Supreme Court cases dealing with that topic. For example, I searched “religion” in the topic search bar at the top of the page, and a list is generated of all passages in the Constitution and in Supreme Court decisions that include the term.

Notice that all the State and federal laws held unconstitutional by the Supreme Court have been tabulated for easy cross-reference.

On the same site are links to digitized primary source documents from the Constitutional Convention. View George Washington’s copy of the constitution draft annotated in his own handwriting! Read a broadside “Ode” celebrating the Constitution. Peruse pamphlets published in state and national newspapers arguing for and against the national Constitution and its ratification process. There is a very helpful “Historical Note” on the formation of the constitution, that places all of these documents in context.

With all these resources, we can surely go forth and “form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”

Summer Reading at Ivy Tech Fort Wayne

As we near the end of our summer term, a condensed semester that can be stressful for students and teachers, remember that Intersession break is coming! Here are some light reading recommendations from your library staff. Any of our staff can help you check them out. We wish everyone a relaxing, enjoyable break.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt. Fort Wayne General Collection F294 .S2B48 1994

I’ve been immersed in True Crime recently while creating displays on our forensics resources, and decided to try this old bestseller in the genre. It is perfect for summer reading, as it takes place in sultry Savannah, Georgia. There is nothing remotely gorey or scary about the story, even though it centers on a fatal shooting. The real-life characters are fascinating, and richer than many fictional people. (Ann Spinney)

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. (Available at four Ivy Tech libraries)

While delayed in an airport recently, I picked up this 1970 book, which has been reissued to capitalize on the Amazon Prime TV series. What a total delight! It is full of clever jokes, from the props – an angel eats deviled eggs while a devil eats angel food cake – to the dialog, the footnotes, and even the fonts. The story is one of the most goodness-affirming I have ever read, imagining how a child thwarts the Apocalypse. It centers on the power of friendship and kindness, through several subplots. The authors are giants of fiction and together they made a masterpiece while having a lot of fun. (Ann Spinney)

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid. Baker & Taylor leased books

Don’t let the lack of umbrellas and sand on the front cover fool you – this is totally a beach read! The entire book is formatted as a transcript from one of those “Where Are They Now?” shows. Daisy Jones was once the epitome of the beautiful, fearless Hollywood princess, and when she merged her voice with up-and-coming rockers The Six, they exploded onto the music scene in a way that’s never been forgotten. This book is a fun read, especially for those of us who remember the 70s fondly. (Carol Gibbs)

Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes. Baker & Taylor leased books

Linda Holmes of NPR fame has written her first novel, and it’s well worth a read. Yes, it’s a romance, but it’s so much more than just waiting for the gal and the guy to finally realize they’re the perfect couple. This gal and guy come off as real people with flaws and problems and hey, guess what – what passes for true love isn’t enough to fix them. They have to dig a little deeper in order to do that. The book deals with emotional abuse, abandonment, the “yips,” and how to start over. A wonderful, heartwarming, satisfying read. (Carol Gibbs)

The Department of Sensitive Crimes by Alexander McCall Smith. Baker & Taylor leased books

McCall Smith writes multiple book series, and this is the first title in a new one he’s recently launched. His writing is quietly humorous and full of meandering thoughts as his characters interact. This series is a parody of the Scandinavian Noir genre, such as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. It’s called Scandi Blanc, and no crime is too insignificant to investigate by the Sensitive Crimes Division. Why was someone stabbed in the back of the knee? Who do you call when an imaginary boyfriend goes missing? And of course: vampires. The fun isn’t found in solving the ‘crimes’ as much as following the preposterous conversations needed to crack the cases. (Carol Gibbs)

Chronicles of a Radical Hag (with Recipes) by Lorna Landvik. Baker & Taylor leased books

This is the story of a long-time columnist for a small-town newspaper. When a stroke sidelines Haze Evans, the newspaper decides to rerun some of her columns written throughout the decades of her employment. What follows is a nice historical retrospective, reminding the reader of how many cultural changes this country has weathered. The people surrounding Haze read her words again and are sometimes able to use them to change their perspectives or see their lives differently. Fun to see how many people were connected through Haze and her words. (Warning: this book does slant to the left. If you’re a curmudgeon like Joseph Snell, one of Haze’s critical readers, this isn’t the book for you!) (Carol Gibbs)

The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker. Baker & Taylor leased books

College students attending college in a small California town begin to fall asleep. They can’t be awakened. Some of them die. And then the sleeping sickness spreads out to the rest of the community. The news media descends to cover the crisis, complete with special terminology and logos. Some think it’s all being faked. Everyone is terrified that they could be next. For such an alarming premise, the writing is amazingly soothing. It’s gentle, even calming. Maybe even dream-like. One of my favorite things about this book was the way the lives of the different characters were shown to be interwoven, even if they weren’t aware of it. I read this book months ago and still sometimes find myself thinking about it. (Carol Gibbs)

Our non-fiction recommendation comes from Elina Puckett, who writes: “This got exceptional reviews. I am listening to it now and have a hard time putting it down.”

Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life by Peter Gray. Baker & Taylor leased books

July 4th: Visit Hawkins, Indiana

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Are you returning to Hawkins, Indiana this summer? You will want to prepare by browsing the library’s collection of books on the weirder aspects of our state. We have a Stranger Things-themed display this month with books on paranormal phenomena, the CIA, government conspiracy theories, the dangers of role-playing games, and more.

 

How to Save Your Ebook Central Bookshelf

On June 19th, your Ivy Tech access to Ebook Central will change.

If you use the Bookshelf feature, your books will not be saved. You must download the list of books on your Bookshelf before the change, and then restock your shelves (so to speak).

It’s easy to download a bibliography. If you have not used the feature before, follow these steps:

Open Ebook Central, Sign in, and go to your Bookshelf. Select a folder to open it.

At the top, click Select All to select all the books in this folder. At the very top, click the giant quotes icon to Cite Folder

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The following dialog box will open

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Click the Export button and save the .txt file where you want it. You can change its name – the default is “citations” – but leave it as a .txt file for best results.

Now go to where you saved it, right click on it, and choose Open With Word 2016.

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Your document will look like this, with each book citation in a paragraph flush left. (It’s not perfect, there is not a line space between two of my citations; but usable for the purpose.)

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June is Great Outdoors month

Gene Stratton-Porter Arbor, Rome City, IN. Photo courtesy of Nicole Treesh

Before you head outdoors, come into the Library and check out our resources for outdoor recreation, outdoor research, and outdoor careers. We have suggestions for all ages and interests:

  • Outdoor activities for kids in Fort Wayne City
  • Guides to Indiana State Parks, and National Parks
  • Wildlife and woodlot management
  • River, lakes, and wetlands ecology

Did you know that public parks are the sites of many, and various, research projects? Check out our showcase of articles, including studies of glaciers, slime molds, predator-prey ecology, erosion control, pest control, human behavior, health effects of outdoor recreation, and more.

You can access data from national parks by visiting the websites of the National Park Service. For photographs and other non-text artifacts, use https://museum.nps.gov For texts (research reports, teaching resources, maps, etc.) use the NPS Library website – it is clunky but has links out to all the parks.

A great new resource is the Open Parks Network. When complete, this database will link all the National Parks digitized collections; currently, representation is mostly from the southeast. Users can search in this one place to find collections of interest, rather than going to multiple websites. For example: Civil War maps from Fort Sumter, moths of Congaree National Park, political memorabilia from the Jimmy Carter National Historic site. Also linked are research reports by national parks staff.

Remember, our databases can be accessed 24/7/365 so you can take your reading with you to the beach, woods, or Indiana State Parks.

Books can be checked out when the library is open. Our summer semester hours are:

  • Mondays-Thursdays 7:45 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.
  • Fridays 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.

See you on the trails!

Pepper, an elderly Cairn Terrier, enjoys the River Greenway. Photo by Ann Spinney.

Celebrating Books, Copyright, and Intellectual Property Rights

April is the coolest month – for librarians! We celebrate National Library Week April 7th-13th, World Book and Copyright Day on April 23rd, and World Intellectual Property Day on April 26th.

You can still add to #MyLibraryMyStory on Twitter, and join the thousands that have been blogging all month. Or just read the great tweets already posted!

What’s the difference between copyright and an intellectual property claim? Intellectual property is the broadest, including copyrights, patents, and trademarks. These are then distinguished by the medium. If your idea is fixed in an image or text – like this page whether online or printed out – you can claim a copyright. If your idea is an invention for a machine or process, you can get a patent. If it is a slogan or logo distinguishing the origin of goods or services, you can claim a trademark. More information is at the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Stop in and see our display on different kinds of intellectual property rights claims, how they contribute to our economy, and how to avoid violating them.

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