Category Archives: Library News

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

This November, please join us in celebrating Native American heritage!

Help us tell all Americans’ stories. Of the many Native Americans spotlighted at Ivy Tech Library, the three below are often regarded as exceptional. Stop by this month to collect one of their bookmarks!

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
U.S. Senator

Born in 1933 of a Portuguese immigrant mother and Northern Cheyenne father, Campbell is one of 44 chiefs of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. He earned a degree in physical education and fine arts after serving in the U.S. Air force from 1951-1953. He served in the Colorado State Legislature before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1987. He won his bid to become a senator in 1992 and won re-election in 1998.

Henry, C. Ben Nighthorse Campbell: Cheyenne Chief and U.S. Senator. Broomall, PA: Chelsea House, 1994.

Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina

From 1947 to 1960, Maria Tallchief performed with the New York City Ballet, gaining prima ballerina status. Later she danced with the American Ballet Theatre, returning to the New York City Ballet in 1963 until her retirement in 1965. But she didn’t retire from dance. She directed the Lyric Opera Ballet of Chicago and founded the Chicago City Ballet in 1981. She was the latter’s artistic director through 1987.

Tallchief, Maria and Kaplan, L. Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Winona LaDuke
Activist, Author

A member of the Anishinaabeg (Ojibew) tribe, Winona LaDuke’s activism dates back to her teens. At age 18 she spoke before the United Nations about Indian issues. While at Harvard earning an economics degree, she worked with grassroots Native American organizations in various states. After graduation, she moved to the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, where she lives today with her family.

LaDuke, Winona. All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 1999. Ms. Magazine, April/May 2001, pp. 46-53.

Find the following ebooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

I am where I come from: Native American college students and graduates tell their life stories

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture

Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

Follow the official celebration here:

NATIONAL NOVEL WRITING MONTH

Whether or not you have committed to the herculean task of scribing 1,667 words daily for a month, you have surely shared the existential dread that comes with an incomplete paper or essay staring back at you.

During NaNoWriMo‘s campaign, accomplished authors are invited to contribute insights or pep talks for fellow writers. The following are some tips that most resonated with me. If you are stuck or could just use a break, these reflections might be helpful to you too.

Jason Reynolds
When you make it to the 3/4 mark of your novel, if you are anything like me, you’re saying one of two things to yourself:

1. I’ve come far enough… to stop. I mean, seriously, I basically wrote a whole novel. I could at least tell people I wrote a whole novel. It’d be a lie. But I wouldn’t feel bad about it. At least not too bad. Because it’s basically whole.

Or 2. I can see the end. I can actually see it. So now I’m going to teleport there. . . .

Anyway, the point is you are ready and willing to cram the next five chapters into the next five sentences.

Don’t do either of these things.

Marie Lu
Just Keep Going.

Write an entire monologue with your main character if you have to. Spend a chapter just exploring the life story of an antagonist. Write a scene with nothing but dialogue between your hero and your villain. Write a steamy love scene between your favorite couple. They don’t have to be scenes in chronological order. They don’t even have to end up in your book. But they will help you to keep going.

Andy Weir
Sometimes, when you’re writing, things come together easily and you can crank out 2,000 words in an afternoon. But other times, it’s torture just to crap out 300 words. In those rough patches, here’s something to keep yourself going: When you read the pages later, you won’t be able to tell which ones you wrote with good flow and which ones were hard. You’re creating the same quality of work in both cases. You might not believe me, but the next time it happens to you, check the results later. You’ll see for yourself. So when you’re having a rough patch, it helps to remember that you’re making progress toward a goal. The words you’re putting down aren’t wasted. They’re just as good as the rest.

National First-Generation College Celebration, Nov. 8th

Library display about first generation college students

All this week we are celebrating first-generation college graduates. This includes many of our Ivy Tech staff, and graduates.

We have a display of selected books by famous first-gens, including neurosurgeon Ben Carson, First Lady Michelle Obama, Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Clarence Thomas, General Colin Powell, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. The books are already getting checked out, so come take a look soon!

The most recent data available (from 2016) shows that 24% of all college students are first-generation. At community colleges, the percentage is 64%. Data also shows that while most first-generation students get financial aid, they do not partake of other college services like academic support and counseling at the same rates as other students (US Dept. of Education). As these helps are often crucial to success in college, this gap is concerning.

College is a new culture, no matter how academically prepared one is. We are having some fun with this by asking people to write down words or phrases that they had to learn – or learn a new meaning of – when they started college. My favorite is “citation”! (I’m sorry, Officer …)

What are some college words you had to learn? Leave a comment here, or come in to the library and help us out with this.

National Novel Writing Month

Remember all those moments in which an idea brightened your mood and refreshed your outlook? Did you ever wonder where those ideas go after you let them go?

Nowhere! They have all been waiting in the back of your head, neglected but banded together in solidarity as your most loyal supporters. Well, it is that time of year again, time to rally them together to produce your masterpiece!

This year, join writers of all varieties in sharing your story of ideas during National Novel Writing Month! The goal is the same every year: 50,000 words in 30 days. Start at the harrowing finale; explore a thesis; develop compelling characters; or just practice your prose!

Even if you have not committed to all 50,000 words, it could not be a better time to join the community: https://www.nanowrimo.org/. Expect reminders, writing prompts, tips, and encouragement right here on Ivy Tech Library’s blog throughout the remainder of the month!

Spirits of Fort Wayne

How will you be remembered?  This October, the Ivy Tech Library calls upon the departed influential Fort Wayne residents to tell their stories. 

Meet Alice Hamilton, a medical doctor from the early 20th century, whose advocacy for workers’ rights proved crucial in industrial poison legislation. Consider Frances Slocum, known as an 18th century Delaware captive, who later in life leveraged her story to prevent the removal of her adopted community from Indiana. You are likely already familiar with Philo Farnsworth and Carole Lombard, but what about Henry Cannady, who selflessly helped former slaves escape through the Underground Railroad?

Many irreplaceable community members are those whose stories demand reevaluation of norms taken for granted, lives buried by nefarious or apathetic forces.  Whose voice would you resurrect?  Who would you give peace?  Who would you condemn?  Find them all at Ivy Tech Library.

All Hallows Read

Spooky Books our Staff Love

All Hallows Read is a world-wide event celebrating the delights of sharing scary stories. It coincides with Hallowe’en. Being spooked can be fun when you have someone to hold on to!

In the Library this month we are displaying books in a range of scary genres – mysteries, horror, gothic, crime – for you to check out. Our staff have some specific recommendations below.

So grab a book, grab a friend, and turn on your reading light in a darkened room …

Dracula by Bram Stoker. View Record in IvyCat

Ann Spinney recommends this because while the story is scary, Stoker’s descriptive passages of moonlight on mountains and other natural scenes are ravishing. It is all very much in the Romantic era style. We also have the Illustrated Junior Library edition of this classic in our collection.

The Skeleton Haunts a House. A Family Skeleton Mystery, Book 3. By Leigh Perry. View Free Kindle Preview

Diana Dudley recommends this one. Sid the Skeleton lives with the family of an adjunct professor. No one knows how he came alive again, but now that he is re-animated, he takes an interest in solving the mysterious deaths of others. On a visit (in costume, of course) to a Halloween Haunted House with his family, Sid is accidentally trapped inside when the police close the place down to investigate an actual dead body. Sid does some investigating of his own.

Diana also recommends Joyland and Duma Key by Stephen King – “they are not too spooky.”

Coraline by Neil Gaiman View Record in IvyCat

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. View Record in IvyCat

Liz Metz recommends these two young adult fantasy books by the masterful Neil Gaiman. They are in our Juvenile Fiction collection.

UnSub and Into the Black Nowhere by Meg Gardiner. View record for UnSub in IvyCat

Nicole Treesh writes, “The spookiest books I’ve enjoyed recently are crime thrillers by Meg Gardiner – UnSub books 1 and 2. The first, UnSub, is inspired by the real Zodiac Killer. It follows ‘a young detective determined to apprehend the serial murderer who destroyed her family and terrorized a city twenty years earlier’ (book jacket). It is in our fiction collection. The second, Into the Black Nowhere, is based on the real-life case of Ted Bundy, ‘an exhilarating thriller in which FBI profiler Caitlin Hendrix faces off against a charming, merciless serial killer’ (book jacket). It is in our Baker & Taylor fiction collection.”

Constitution day September 17th

Celebrate Constitution Day by spending some time with the document that grants US citizens their rights and privileges. An annotated online version is available from Congress.gov that aims to increase understanding of the Constitution and how it affects our society.

Constitution Annotated allows users to browse through all the Articles and Amendments, providing links to Supreme Court decisions based on each. Users can also perform topic searches and find all the passages in the Articles and Amendments and the Supreme Court cases dealing with that topic. For example, I searched “religion” in the topic search bar at the top of the page, and a list is generated of all passages in the Constitution and in Supreme Court decisions that include the term.

Notice that all the State and federal laws held unconstitutional by the Supreme Court have been tabulated for easy cross-reference.

On the same site are links to digitized primary source documents from the Constitutional Convention. View George Washington’s copy of the constitution draft annotated in his own handwriting! Read a broadside “Ode” celebrating the Constitution. Peruse pamphlets published in state and national newspapers arguing for and against the national Constitution and its ratification process. There is a very helpful “Historical Note” on the formation of the constitution, that places all of these documents in context.

With all these resources, we can surely go forth and “form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”