Category Archives: Displays

How Are You?

While isolating ourselves for the remainder of the semester, wellness may be demanding priority in your daily routine. Among the many national observances that the library will be recognizing this month, Stress Awareness Month is particularly relevant. Home life can sometimes compound stress. Whether or not we now have time for ourselves, take time for yourself.

Here are three eBooks available to Ivy Tech students and faculty that may provide some ways of mitigating stress:

The Mindful Twenty-Something
The Age of Overwhelm
Inhale, Exhale, Repeat

More specific to the challenges we face from the ongoing pandemic, you may have noticed a number of emails from the college itself. Included were references to Ivy Tech programs like IvyCares and IvyAssist, which assist students in connecting with critical social services or other vital community resources.

HelpGuide has produced an incredibly comprehensive guide to help cope with pandemic related stress: Coronavirus Anxiety: Coping with Stress, Fear, and Uncertainty. It not only shares sound advice to help manage mental wellness but also includes crisis numbers.

Be well.

Pi à la Mode

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Every year on March Fourteenth people around the world celebrate the most famous mathematical constant: the ratio of the length of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. This is an irrational number, approximated to 3.14 (or 3.1415926) and represented by the Greek letter π. As a number, π is transcendental and real as well as irrational. Mathematician James Glaisher remarked of π that “a complete account of its calculation would almost amount to a history of mathematics.” (Quoted in: William Dunham, The Genius of Euler: Reflections on His Life and Work: On the History of Euler’s Constant (The Mathematical Association of America, 2007), p. 147.)

π has been calculated out to over a trillion decimal places, but we still do not know where it ends! Competitions to recite the known sequence of digits are held regularly around the world. (See pi-world-ranking-list.com for record-setting recitations.)

Mathematician Mark Kac noted that “pi, so intimately connected with circles, keeps cropping up in probability theory and statistics, the two disciplines which deal with randomness and luck.” (Mark Kac, Enigmas of Chance: An Autobiography: The Search for the Meaning of Independence (Harper & Row, 1985), p. 55.) We have an activity set up for you to experience this, based on Buffon’s Needle, the proof named after Georges-Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, a scientist who enjoyed gambling.

The Greek letter π is pronounced like our English word “pie” – hence the puns, since pie is usually made in a circular pan, and, being a delicious pastry, may be difficult to divide fairly, as memorialized in the old English nursery rhyme:

A was once an Apple pie; B bit it; C cut it; D dealt it; E eat it; F fought for it; G got it; H had it; I inspected it; J joined it; K kept it; L longed for it; M mourned for it; N nodded at it; O opened it; P peeped in it; Q quartered it; R ran for it; S stole it; T took it; U upset it; V viewed it; W wanted it; X, Y, Z, and ampersand, all wished for a piece in hand.

March Fourteenth is also the birthday of Albert Einstein (b. 1879), who theorized what is perhaps the most famous equation using a constant in our universe: the relationship of mass to energy, represented by E=mc2 (E=energy; m=mass; c=the speed of light).

March Fourteenth is the death anniversary of another famous physicist: Stephen Hawking (d. 2018) who developed theories about the origins of our universe, and black holes, based on Einstein’s work.

The Library is displaying books by and about Einstein and Hawking, plus books on number theory and pastries, this month.

Come on in for some Pi!

 

National Ethics Awareness Month

No matter your area of study or line of work, ethics have an effect on policies, principles, and behavior. As an official observance, National Ethics Awareness Month draws attention to how crucial the ongoing study and practice of ethical engagement is.

Modernity comes with unforeseen dilemmas that shape the way we experience the world. Ethics takes a practical approach in exploring humane and sensible solutions to otherwise unavoidable and irreconcilable problems.

Ivy Tech offers a number of classes that take exclusive looks at ethics through the lens of many different disciplines:

PHIL 102: Introduction to Ethics
LEGS 170: Legal Ethics
TMAS 120: Ethics and Massage Management
BUSN 120: Ethics and Social Responsibility
CRIM 201: Ethics in Criminal Justice
HLHS 105: Medical Law and Ethics
HUMS 220: Issues and Ethics in Human Services

More information on these classes and more can be found here: https://www.ivytech.edu/course-catalog/.

The library has also curated a small collection of our books to further showcase National Ethics Awareness Month. Please stop by to not only find which dilemmas most apply to your life but to also discover if you can contribute to their resolutions!

In honor of this month’s observance, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

Black History and The Vote

The 15th amendment was ratified 150 years ago today, but it was not until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that black women shared a voice with black men at the voting booth. At the time of the Act’s passing there were only six African-American representatives in the House, while there was only one Senator. Today, representation has improved in the House, but there are still only three black Senators.

This Black History Month officially recognizes challenges faced and the barriers that remain between black voices and representation. Less overt than previous iterations of oppression, voter suppression in the form of gerrymandering, draconian voter ID laws, and the dissemination of misinformation subvert the potential resolution of issues faced by the black community.

The library has prepared some resources for students to further explore Black History and the Vote. Be sure to stop by and check out a book or two! In honor of this month’s observance and celebration, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

Scholarship is a Conversation – What will You say?

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The concept of scholarship as a conversation reflects the origins of learned societies and their journals. Many journals still in existence – such as Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society – began as correspondence between researchers working on similar topics. For example, the circles of Samuel Hartlib and Henry Oldenburg sent such letters to each other; both are associated with the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge (its full name), the oldest scientific society in the world. (Encyclopedia Britannica has excellent articles with sources on both these gentlemen and the Society.)

The Association of College & Research Libraries includes “Scholarship As Conversation” in its Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. The framework, meant to be open to instantiation in different contexts, emphasizes citations as representing this conversation.

Citations help researchers to find more research, as when you find an article that was cited in another article or book or website. That sense of being “on the trail” of an idea is one of the joys of research. Even more exciting is when you formulate your own point of view on a topic, built on information others have provided. You cite their work, and your own work stands out as your original contribution. You have the last word in the conversation!

Formatting citations is not easy, and you may wonder why they are done the way they are? Again, the styles have origins in the communities of scholars that formed around particular topics. Scientists want to know how recent a publication is before reading it; also scientific reports often have multiple authors, all of whose names need to index. Thus it makes sense that the APA citation format doesn’t spell out author first names, and puts the date of publication right after them. 

The library has many tools to help you with citing your sources: check out our current display board for ideas. Our online Guide gathers citations aids in many formats. If you prefer in-person help, bring your citation questions to the librarians: we are here to assist you! 

Once upon a time, it was a dark and stormy night … perfect for exploring our Children’s Collections

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Did you know your library has a large collection of children’s books and storytelling props like puppets & felt boards? Plus, we have step-stools for reaching the top shelves and big bean bag chairs to curl up and read in. Children accompanying their parents to the library are welcome to read our books.

Our children’s collections support Ivy Tech Fort Wayne’s programs in Education. They also grew out of the Family Reading Center in the old library.

In addition to stories, we have children’s books on every topic – including activities in science, math, music, and art. We have books about holidays from many cultural traditions, plus DVDs and music CDs. And we subscribe to the Junior Library Guild which sends us new books each month! You can see a list and follow updates to the collection on our blog using this link.

We also have books for grown-ups about teaching kids and young adults. From the library website, you can access databases of professional literature in education research, and ebooks on education topics.

Our librarian Liz Metz has created research guides to children’s literature, and to education resources. She also made our online catalog of puppets. Liz has a degree in elementary education and is our liaison for the education programs here. You can read more about her background in this profile.

New Year, New Possibilities

It is only 2 days into the new year, but that might as well be 2 months when committing to new habits. Whether or not you have already delayed your resolution for another taste, one thing is for sure: There is no need to let personal investments hinge on the ceremony of an arbitrary calendar day. We’ve curated a small collection of books that might help your expectations and goals cooperate longer than you do with that last slice of vice. Get a jump on the upcoming semester and stop by Fort Wayne Ivy Tech Library today to explore both your personal and academic possibilities!