Category Archives: Schools

Ink Cloud 2020

Click HERE to download!

It is my pleasure to present to you Ink Cloud 2020.  It has been a gift during quarantine to put this edition together for those who were able to participate.  

Please take a few moments to enjoy the transformative effects of art created by Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff. We do not typically receive much traffic on this blog, but if you do stop by and one of these poets or artists reaches you, please let them know in the comments!

Let’s give everyone a reason to keep creating and sharing.

How Are You?

While isolating ourselves for the remainder of the semester, wellness may be demanding priority in your daily routine. Among the many national observances that the library will be recognizing this month, Stress Awareness Month is particularly relevant. Home life can sometimes compound stress. Whether or not we now have time for ourselves, take time for yourself.

Here are three eBooks available to Ivy Tech students and faculty that may provide some ways of mitigating stress:

The Mindful Twenty-Something
The Age of Overwhelm
Inhale, Exhale, Repeat

More specific to the challenges we face from the ongoing pandemic, you may have noticed a number of emails from the college itself. Included were references to Ivy Tech programs like IvyCares and IvyAssist, which assist students in connecting with critical social services or other vital community resources.

HelpGuide has produced an incredibly comprehensive guide to help cope with pandemic related stress: Coronavirus Anxiety: Coping with Stress, Fear, and Uncertainty. It not only shares sound advice to help manage mental wellness but also includes crisis numbers.

Be well.

Ink Cloud

While we all adjust to the uninvited consequences of the pandemic, please consider investing time in your creativity. Few explorations are more transformative and empowering than cultivating your art.

Submissions for the 2020 Ink Cloud publication will remain open until April 19th. Please share your original poetry with us. Original artwork for the magazine’s cover remains just as welcome.

Contingent on student and staff interest and time, the Ink Cloud Open Mic is still possible, but the venue would be moved online. Expect those specifics mid-April. In the meantime, stay safe and create.

Details: library.ivytech.edu/inkcloud
Questions or suggestions: rwierbiki@ivytech.edu

Pi à la Mode

IMG_4546

Every year on March Fourteenth people around the world celebrate the most famous mathematical constant: the ratio of the length of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. This is an irrational number, approximated to 3.14 (or 3.1415926) and represented by the Greek letter π. As a number, π is transcendental and real as well as irrational. Mathematician James Glaisher remarked of π that “a complete account of its calculation would almost amount to a history of mathematics.” (Quoted in: William Dunham, The Genius of Euler: Reflections on His Life and Work: On the History of Euler’s Constant (The Mathematical Association of America, 2007), p. 147.)

π has been calculated out to over a trillion decimal places, but we still do not know where it ends! Competitions to recite the known sequence of digits are held regularly around the world. (See pi-world-ranking-list.com for record-setting recitations.)

Mathematician Mark Kac noted that “pi, so intimately connected with circles, keeps cropping up in probability theory and statistics, the two disciplines which deal with randomness and luck.” (Mark Kac, Enigmas of Chance: An Autobiography: The Search for the Meaning of Independence (Harper & Row, 1985), p. 55.) We have an activity set up for you to experience this, based on Buffon’s Needle, the proof named after Georges-Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, a scientist who enjoyed gambling.

The Greek letter π is pronounced like our English word “pie” – hence the puns, since pie is usually made in a circular pan, and, being a delicious pastry, may be difficult to divide fairly, as memorialized in the old English nursery rhyme:

A was once an Apple pie; B bit it; C cut it; D dealt it; E eat it; F fought for it; G got it; H had it; I inspected it; J joined it; K kept it; L longed for it; M mourned for it; N nodded at it; O opened it; P peeped in it; Q quartered it; R ran for it; S stole it; T took it; U upset it; V viewed it; W wanted it; X, Y, Z, and ampersand, all wished for a piece in hand.

March Fourteenth is also the birthday of Albert Einstein (b. 1879), who theorized what is perhaps the most famous equation using a constant in our universe: the relationship of mass to energy, represented by E=mc2 (E=energy; m=mass; c=the speed of light).

March Fourteenth is the death anniversary of another famous physicist: Stephen Hawking (d. 2018) who developed theories about the origins of our universe, and black holes, based on Einstein’s work.

The Library is displaying books by and about Einstein and Hawking, plus books on number theory and pastries, this month.

Come on in for some Pi!

 

National Ethics Awareness Month

No matter your area of study or line of work, ethics have an effect on policies, principles, and behavior. As an official observance, National Ethics Awareness Month draws attention to how crucial the ongoing study and practice of ethical engagement is.

Modernity comes with unforeseen dilemmas that shape the way we experience the world. Ethics takes a practical approach in exploring humane and sensible solutions to otherwise unavoidable and irreconcilable problems.

Ivy Tech offers a number of classes that take exclusive looks at ethics through the lens of many different disciplines:

PHIL 102: Introduction to Ethics
LEGS 170: Legal Ethics
TMAS 120: Ethics and Massage Management
BUSN 120: Ethics and Social Responsibility
CRIM 201: Ethics in Criminal Justice
HLHS 105: Medical Law and Ethics
HUMS 220: Issues and Ethics in Human Services

More information on these classes and more can be found here: https://www.ivytech.edu/course-catalog/.

The library has also curated a small collection of our books to further showcase National Ethics Awareness Month. Please stop by to not only find which dilemmas most apply to your life but to also discover if you can contribute to their resolutions!

In honor of this month’s observance, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

What is Ink Cloud?

That relies on what you want to say!

What started as a poetry contest to celebrate National Poetry Month in April of 2015 has become an annual Ivy Tech Fort Wayne Library publication. Ink Cloud showcases the poetic and artistic talents of Ivy Tech Fort Wayne students and staff.

This year we embrace the non-competitive nature of the art of poetry by dedicating the event entirely to its contributors. A poem’s merit can speak for itself. But unlike its merit, poetry expects only one thing from you: You will share it.

Anyone who has shared their work knows that the spirit of poetry waits within its release. So share with us! If you choose to share with us, you can expect to be included in 2020’s publication of Ink Cloud. Then join us and your fellow Ivy Tech poets at the Ink Cloud Poetry Reading to listen and be heard!

Find the details here: https://library.ivytech.edu/inkcloud!

In addition to poetry, participants may submit original artwork to be considered for the Ink Cloud cover. We are also looking for talented graphic designers to reimagine the Ink Cloud logo.

New Children’s Books

“Jack is a rule-proof bundle of bunny-eared id who does as he pleases, and therein lies his considerable charm.” (BCCB)

Hi, Jack! by Mac Barnett & Greg Pizzoli: PIC BAR

In a book as cheerful and charming as Snail himself, Corey Tabor tells a winning tale of a slow but steady snail, whose determination and kindness bring him the best reward of all: friendship.

Snail Crossing by Corey R. Tabor: PIC TAB

“This heartwarming story of a boy and his beloved dog opens the door for further study of our 16th president.” (Kirkus Reviews)

Honey: The Dog Who Saved Abe Lincoln by Shari Swanson: E457.32 .S93 2019

“A wonderfully specific book that will delight the right readers, especially in maple syrup territory of the Northeast and Midwest.” (Booklist)

Bear Goes Sugaring by Maxwell Eaton III: TP395 .E28 2019

In addition to promoting the value of patience, Schmidt’s story will also be valuable for early study of changing seasons and teaching where food comes from.” (School Library Journal)

Almost Time Gary D. Schmidt & Elizabeth Stickney: PIC SCH

“Where’s Baby? is a beautifully illustrated hide-and-seek book for preschool aged children who want a light, playful read.” (CM Magazine)

Where’s Baby? by Anne Hunter: PIC HUN

“Echoes of child persistence and adult exasperation might ring familiar to grownup readers, but mostly this will earn plenty of giggles from fans of Jon Klassen and Lemony Snicket.” (BCCB)

Please Don’t Eat Me by Liz Climo: PIC CLI

Black History and The Vote

The 15th amendment was ratified 150 years ago today, but it was not until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that black women shared a voice with black men at the voting booth. At the time of the Act’s passing there were only six African-American representatives in the House, while there was only one Senator. Today, representation has improved in the House, but there are still only three black Senators.

This Black History Month officially recognizes challenges faced and the barriers that remain between black voices and representation. Less overt than previous iterations of oppression, voter suppression in the form of gerrymandering, draconian voter ID laws, and the dissemination of misinformation subvert the potential resolution of issues faced by the black community.

The library has prepared some resources for students to further explore Black History and the Vote. Be sure to stop by and check out a book or two! In honor of this month’s observance and celebration, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

New Children’s Books

“Stunning…brilliantly colored…striking… Just the right amount of tension, delicious vocabulary…and alliterative phrases make this a first purchase for group and one-on-one sharing. Count on requests for many readings.” (School Library Journal)

One Fox: A Counting Book Thriller by Kate Read: PIC REA

“Lin’s spirited text is tailor-made for reading aloud, and the homey treatment of a grand phenomenon again delights.” (BCCB)

A Big Bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin: PIC LIN / Winter

“The combination of Twain’s (often sarcastic) humor and lessons of life, a touch of allegory, and Stead’s own storytelling skills result in an awesome piece of fantasy.” (School Library Journal)

The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine by Mark Twain:
PIC TWA

“Photos of Moto, both as a fluffy-faced baby and an active, handsome adult, are the clear scene-stealers, but plenty of interesting facts on servals are included. More than one reader will consider following in Eszterhas’ footsteps.” (Booklist)

Moto and Me: My Year As a Wildcat’s Foster Mom by Suzi Eszterhas: QL737.C23 E7943 2017

“A surprising meditation on the artistic process. Lee sticks the landing in style.” (NPR Best Books of the Year)

Lines by Suzy Lee: PIC LEE

“Stillness, tenderness, and hope are the essence of this quiet gem.” (Kirkus Reviews)

Little Mole’s Wish by Sang-Keun Kim: PIC KIM / Winter

Bertha, Richard, and Eugen pushed a strange machine out of the shop and into the alley. They were sneaking away with Papa’s invention!

Bertha Takes a Drive: How the Benz Automobile Changed the World by Jan Adkins: GV1025.G3 A113 2017