Category Archives: School of Arts, Sciences & Education

National Kindergarten Day

National Kindergarten Day occurred this year on Sunday, April 21st. Our student worker Kayti created this attractive and informative display that we have been enjoying for a couple of weeks already. As she says, “Celebrate by grabbing a book to read or teaching a child something new!” All the books, puppets, and music on the display may be checked out.

Did you ever wonder why it is called Kindergarten – a German word? It’s origins are in Europe in the 1770s. The German educator Friedrich Froebel coined the name Kindergarten for a pre-school in which children (Kinder) would achieve self-understanding through playing with each other, and grow like plants in a garden (Garten).

 

New Children’s Books for April 2019

New Fiction

Alma and How She Got Her Name

By Juana Martinez-Neal
Call Number: PIC MAR
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If you ask her, Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela has way too many names: six! How did such a small person wind up with such a large name? Alma turns to Daddy for an answer and learns of Sofia, the grandmother who loved books and flowers; Esperanza, the great-grandmother who longed to travel; José, the grandfather who was an artist; and other namesakes, too. As she hears the story of her name, Alma starts to think it might be a perfect fit after all — and realizes that she will one day have her own story to tell.

The Happy Book

By Andy Rash
Call Number: PIC RAS
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Camper is happy as a clam and Clam is a happy camper. When you live in The Happy Book, the world is full of daisies and sunshine and friendship cakes . . . until your best friend eats the whole cake and doesn’t save you one bite. Moving from happiness to sadness and everything in between, Camper and Clam have a hard time finding their way back to happy. But maybe happy isn’t the goal–being a good friend is about supporting each other and feeling all the feels together.

Croc & Turtle

By Mike Wohnoutka
Call Number: PIC WOH
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Meet Croc! He is the strongest and fastest crocodile around.
Meet Turtle! He agrees that Croc is the strongest and fastest.
But what happens when Elephant lifts that heavy rock with ease? And when Cheetah speeds on by?
Croc and Turtle might not be the strongest or the fastest, but they’re definitely the best at something even more important . . .

Where is My Balloon?

By Ariel Bernstein
Call Number: PIC BER
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Owl has a balloon. Monkey has a sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole. But then Owl asks Monkey to hold his balloon, just for a second. What do you think happens? POP! When Owl returns and asks for his balloon, Monkey offers him everything under the sun…except for the balloon. Can their friendship survive this catastrophe?

The Donkey Egg

By Janet Stevens and Susan Stevens Crummel
Call Number: PIC STE
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Bear would rather sleep all day than work on his farm, and Fox knows just the kind of help he needs—a donkey! When Fox tricks Bear into buying a donkey egg, Bear can’t wait for it to hatch so he can meet his new friend. But donkeys don’t come from eggs! And when the “egg” finally opens, Bear gets a fruity surprise. Luckily, Bear doesn’t have to face disappointment alone . . . Hare is there to help!

New Nonfiction

Bloom Boom!

By April Pulley Sayre
Call Number: QK 49 .S32 2019 Spring
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When spring arrives, flowers of all kinds sprout and grow buds and bloom. Sometimes, they bloom a few at a time. But other times, many will bloom at once in a colorful flower boom! This photographic exploration of flowers goes from the desert to the woodlands and beyond, celebrating their beautiful variety and the science behind these colorful displays.

My Happy Year by E. Bluebird (A Nature Diary)

By Paul Meisel
Call Number: QL 696 .P288 M4325 2019
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“May 1. Today is my birthday.” So begins the wondrous first year of E. Bluebird. Readers are treated to the intimate details of her life such as “May 8: Eating all these bugs makes me poop. Mom takes my poop sack out of the nest. Good thing.” And “May 12: My brothers and sisters are getting ready to leave the nest. I like it here. It’s safe.” On May 18: “Where’s my family? I’m getting hungry. Okay. This is it! I jump! I flap! I’m flying!” She eventually migrates south, and when she returns north, she finds a mate and has a family of her own. What a happy year!

Gecko

By Raymond Huber
Call Number: QL 666 .L245 H83 2019
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Meet the gecko, the escape artist of the lizard world. Hawks, rats, and snakes would love to catch one for their dinner, but the gecko’s amazing ability to protect itself and outsmart predators keeps it safe from day to day. The gecko is more than a match for its pursuers, using clever camouflage and dropping its tail as a decoy to evade them. And even beyond its escape abilities, the gecko is fascinating, with feet covered in tiny hairs for gripping (even upside down!) and eyes that it cleans with its tongue. This wonderful introduction to one of the coolest lizards on the planet will captivate amateur scientists.

Never Home Alone

97815416457451From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live

By Rob Dunn

Call Number: QH309 .D866 2018

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Just in time for mud season, we have acquired this best-selling science book. It is a fun read, and contains relevant information for our agriculture, biology, building construction, culinary, health sciences, and HVAC-R programs. Rob Dunn is a rigorous scientist who writes in an engaging style about his research, revealing how simple curiosity can advance knowledge. There are so many astonishing facts in this “natural history of where we live,” that readers will be transported back to a childlike appreciation for creepy-crawlies. Dunn also walks  through the history of microbiology as he investigates water pipes, air systems, construction materials, kitchens, and the bodies of humans and their pets. There is a good dose of social history, too, as he considers how science has changed the way we live – not always for the better. His frank admission of what biologists don’t know yet will inspire budding scientists.

New Children’s Books for March

Fiction

Five Flying Penguins

By Barbara Barbieri McGrath
Call Number: PIC MCG
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With a rhyming narrative that counts to five, adorable penguins are soaring–or flying–through the sea, trying to elude a lurking creature. But as young readers of this charming tale will discover, a friendly seal is only looking to play a game of tag.

William Wakes Up

By Linda Ashman
Call Number: PIC ASH
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William and his animal friends have had the whole winter to nap. Now it’s time for them to wake up and welcome a very special guest. There’s lots to do to get ready, from scrubbing the floors to decorating the house to baking a tasty treat. But it’s so hard to leave a cozy bed. . . . Will everyone get up in time to do their part?

How to Give Your Cat a Bath

By Nicola Winstanley
Call Number: PIC WIN
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Step one: fill the bath
Step two: put the cat in the bath
Step three: put shampoo on the cat
Step four: rinse the cat
Step five: dry the cat

Seems simple, right? One problem: the cat has no intention of doing ANY of these things! Watch as the steps keep changing, the cat keeps escaping, the girl keeps eating cookies and the mess keeps escalating. Soon it’s not just the cat who needs a bath–it’s the whole house!

The Adventures of Zip: Poof! A Bot!

By David Milgram
Call Number: PIC MIL
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Zip has zapped a bot. Zip tells the bot what to do. Will the bot listen? (Spoiler alert: The bot does not listen and Zip learns an important lesson, complete with a pie being thrown in his face!)

Good Night Wind

By Linda Elovitz Marshall
Call Number: PIC MAR
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In this retelling of a Yiddish folktale, “Winter Wind worked hard all season long / blowing away leaves, / preparing trees for coats of snow and ice.” Now, Wind is tired and needs a place to rest. But no one wants to shelter so cold and blustery a Wind–not the townspeople, not the country innkeeper, not even the gnarled tree who is worried about frozen roots. Finally, Wind does what any of us do when we are overtired: Wind has a tantrum. And it is only with the help of two small children brave enough to weather the storm that Wind finally finds the perfect place to sleep.

Non-Fiction

The Hen who Sailed Around the World

By Guirec Soudée
Call Number: SF487.5 .S68 2018
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Monique is a highly accomplished chicken: she surfs, she skateboards, and she just crossed the world on a tiny boat with her human companion, Guirec, who helped steer. On their three-year journey, together they were unstoppable. When they became stranded in the ice off Greenland for four months, Monique, unruffled as always, kept Guirec alive with her eggs– and they both made it home.

Snowman – Cold = Puddle

By Laura Purdie Salas
Call Number: QB637.5 .S25 2019
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Math meets metaphor in this eye-opening exploration of spring. Each clever equation is a tiny, perfect poem that prompts readers to look at the ordinary and see the miraculous. Can you look at an egg in a nest and see a jewelry box? How are sunlight and heat like an alarm clock? Engaging sidebars reveal the science behind the signs of spring.

Educated: A Memoir

81wojuxbbflCall Number: CT3262.I2 W47 2018
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Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills bag.” In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father’s junkyard. Her father distrusted the medical establishment, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when an older brother became violent. When another brother got himself into college and came back with news of the world beyond the mountain, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. She taught herself enough mathematics, grammar, and science to take the ACT and was admitted to Brigham Young University. There, she studied psychology, politics, philosophy, and history, learning for the first time about pivotal world events like the Holocaust and the Civil Rights Movement. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

New Children’s Books for February

Fiction

I Do Not Like Books Anymore!

By Daisy Hirst
Call Number: PIC HIR
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Natalie and Alphonse REALLY like books. Picture books with Dad, scary stories with Mom, and especially stories they remember or make up themselves. So when it’s time for Natalie to learn to read, she thinks it will be exciting — she can have all the stories in the world now, and even read them to Alphonse. But when Natalie gets her first reading book, the letters look like squiggles and it isn’t even a good story; it’s just about a cat that can sit. “I do not like books anymore!” Natalie declares. But she still wants to make up stories. With Alphonse’s help, can she find a way to turn a love of telling stories into a love of reading stories?

Winter is Here

By Kevin Henkes
Call Number: PIC HEN / Winter
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Snow falls, animals burrow, and children prepare for the wonders winter brings. Caldecott Medalist and award-winning author Kevin Henkes’s striking text introduces basic concepts of language and the unique beauty of the winter season. Laura Dronzek’s expressive paintings beautifully capture the joyful wonders of winter.

Carmela: Full of Wishes

By Matt De La Pena
Call Number: PIC DEL
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When Carmela wakes up on her birthday, her wish has already come true–she’s finally old enough to join her big brother as he does the family errands. Together, they travel through their neighborhood, past the crowded bus stop, the fenced-off repair shop, and the panadería, until they arrive at the Laundromat, where Carmela finds a lone dandelion growing in the pavement. But before she can blow its white fluff away, her brother tells her she has to make a wish. If only she can think of just the right wish to make . . .

Space Cows

By Eric Seltzer
Call Number: PIC SEL
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Space cows fly high. Space cows fly low.
Space cows dance three in a row.
Space cows are green. Space cows are blue.
Some of them quack (but most of them moo)!

Read all about space cows in this book for beginning readers who like to giggle!

Nonfiction

Sun! One in a Billion

By Stacy McAnulty
Call Number: QB 521.5 .M39 2018
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Meet Sun: He’s a star! And not just any star―he’s one in a billion. He lights up our solar system and makes life possible. With characteristic humor and charm, Stacy McAnulty channels the voice of Sun in this next celestial “autobiography.”

Polka Dot Parade: A Book about Bill Cunningham

By Deborah Blumenthal
Call Number: TR140.C778 B58 2018
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Every day, Bill Cunningham pedaled his bike through New York City searching for beauty. As he took picture after picture, Bill found beauty not in people, but in their clothes. Drawn to bold and creative choices, Bill’s photos captured the attention of the New York Times. He traveled to Paris for Fashion Week, and admiration for his work grew. With his sense of creativity and daringness, his own personal style of photography came to be known as street art photography. His photos left a lasting impression on all those who came across his work and they continue to inspire creativity today.

Dreamers

By Yuyi Morales
Call Number: E 184 .M5 M67 2018
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In 1994, Yuyi Morales left her home in Xalapa, Mexico and came to the US with her infant son. She left behind nearly everything she owned, but she didn’t come empty-handed. She brought her strength, her work, her passion, her hopes and dreams…and her stories. Caldecott Honor artist and five-time Pura Belpré winner Yuyi Morales’s gorgeous new picture book Dreamers is about making a home in a new place. Yuyi and her son Kelly’s passage was not easy, and Yuyi spoke no English whatsoever at the time. But together, they found an unexpected, unbelievable place: the public library. There, book by book, they untangled the language of this strange new land, and learned to make their home within it.

New Children’s Books for January

Fiction

Thank You, Omu!

By Oge Mora
Call Number: PIC MOR
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Everyone in the neighborhood dreams of a taste of Omu’s delicious stew! One by one, they follow their noses toward the scrumptious scent. And one by one, Omu offers a portion of her meal. Soon the pot is empty. Has she been so generous that she has nothing left for herself?

The Boy Who Went to Mars

By Simon James
Call Number: PIC JAM
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On the day that Stanley’s mom takes a work trip overnight, Stanley decides to leave planet Earth. But when his spaceship touches down again in the backyard, a young martian crawls out, proclaiming to Stanley’s dad that residents of Mars don’t wash before dinner, eat their vegetables, or brush their teeth. It just so happens that martians tend to act out in school, too. . . . With whimsy and sympathy for a familiar dilemma, Simon James ushers us into the coping fantasies of an imaginative, sensitive kid — and shares the pleasure of his sheepish reunion with a most accepting family.

Kitten and the Night Watchman

By John Sullivan
Call Number: PIC SUL
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The night watchman hugs his wife and kids and drives to work.
All night he is alone.
Every hour he makes his rounds.

When he is joined by a stray kitten, the night suddenly seems different. Has the kitten found a new home? Kitten and the Night Watchman is inspired by the true story of author John Sullivan meeting a stray cat while working as a night watchman. The cat, Beebe, was John’s companion for seventeen years.

Giraffe Problems

By Jory John
Call Number: PIC JOH
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Edward the giraffe can’t understand why his neck is as long and bendy and, well, ridiculous as it is. No other animal has a neck this absurd. He’s tried disguising it, dressing it up, strategically hiding it behind bushes–honestly, anything you can think of, he’s tried. Just when he has exhausted his neck-hiding options and is about to throw in the towel, a turtle swoops in (well, ambles in, very slowly) and helps him understand that his neck has a purpose, and looks excellent in a bow tie.

Nonfiction

Tadpole to Frog: National Geographic Readers

By Shira Evans
Call Number: QL 668 .E2 E83 2018
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Learn all about how animals grow and change in this leveled Co-reader, perfect for parents and kids to read together. Through vibrant, adorable images and expert-vetted text, you’ll glimpse some of the most amazing metamorphoses in the natural world. Kids will see a tadpole transform into a frog, watch a caterpillar become a butterfly, and learn how a nymph becomes a dragonfly.

Cute as an Axolotl: Discovering the World’s Most Adorable Animals

By Jess Keating
Call Number: QL 49 .K347 2018
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The Internet pretty much runs on cute animal photos, but “cute” is so much more than clickbait kittens and insta-pups. Cute is for feathery-gilled axolotls (pronounced: ax-uh-LOT-ulz), shy pygmy hippos, poisonous blue dragons, and armored pangolins. All of these animals are cute, but they’ve also adapted remarkable ways to survive in their unique environments.

Inky’s Amazing Escape: How A Very Smart Octopus Found His Way Home

By Sy Montgomery
Call Number: QL 430.3 .O2 M65 2018
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Inky had been at the New Zealand aquarium since 2014 after being taken in by a fisherman who found him at sea. Inky had been getting used to his new environment, but the staff quickly figured out that he had to be kept amused or he would get bored. Then one night in 2016 Inky, about the size of a basketball, decided he’d had enough. He slithered eight feet across the floor and down a drainpipe more than 160 feet long to his home in the sea.