Category Archives: School of Arts, Sciences & Education

Once upon a time, it was a dark and stormy night … perfect for exploring our Children’s Collections

ECED display board

Did you know your library has a large collection of children’s books and storytelling props like puppets & felt boards? Plus, we have step-stools for reaching the top shelves and big bean bag chairs to curl up and read in. Children accompanying their parents to the library are welcome to read our books.

Our children’s collections support Ivy Tech Fort Wayne’s programs in Education. They also grew out of the Family Reading Center in the old library.

In addition to stories, we have children’s books on every topic – including activities in science, math, music, and art. We have books about holidays from many cultural traditions, plus DVDs and music CDs. And we subscribe to the Junior Library Guild which sends us new books each month! You can see a list and follow updates to the collection on our blog using this link.

We also have books for grown-ups about teaching kids and young adults. From the library website, you can access databases of professional literature in education research, and ebooks on education topics.

Our librarian Liz Metz has created research guides to children’s literature, and to education resources. She also made our online catalog of puppets. Liz has a degree in elementary education and is our liaison for the education programs here. You can read more about her background in this profile.

New Children's Books

“Digitally collaged illustrations, done in a warm color palette, use simplified shapes to playfully symbolize different objects. Close-ups of the starlings’ lustrous, rainbowlike colors highlight Preston-Gannon’s skillful understanding of the way light reveals itself on a dark form.” (Kirkus Reviews)

One Dark Bird by Liz Garton Scanlon: PIC SCA

“Engle’s free verse whirls and twirls, playful and vivacious, while López’s vivid, colorful artwork elevates this story to heavenly heights. Like a concerto for the heart.” (Kirkus Reviews)

Dancing Hands: How Teresa Carreno Played the Piano for President Lincoln by Margarita Engle and Rafael Lopez: ML3930.C2635 E55 2019

“Seventeen different trees are represented by a scattered array of leaves―each carefully labeled―in many gradations of green. The enticing collage art uses negative space to show the veins. The page turn leads to additional glorious art, affirming the text’s use of such words as ’emerald’ and ‘jade.'” (Kirkus Reviews)

Summer Green to Autumn Gold: Uncovering Leaves’ Hidden Colors by Mia Posada: QK649 .P67 2020

“This comedic horror-lite story about snacks is just delectable, and offers an avenue of connection between the generations.” (School Library Journal)

Snack Attack! by Terry Border: PIC BOR

“Investigating the wordless spreads is both a challenge and a joy. . . . When child and cat finally reunite, the sweet relief feels immediate and intimate . . .” (Kirkus Reviews)

Spot & Dot by Henry Cole: PIC COL

New Culinary Books

Enjoy biscuits and cakes, puddings and pies, from romance and comedy through to horror and science fiction, and discover fun, edible versions of your favorite novels.

Scone with the Wind: Cakes & Bakes with a Literary Twist by Miss Victoria Sponge: TX771 .S366 2015

“Jenny’s creative cookie designs are achievable, yet impressive. Jenny always delivers when it comes to creating eye-catching and delicious treats that everyone can enjoy.” (Desiree Smith, Wilton Brands)

Cookie Class: 120 Irresistible Decorating Ideas for Any Occasion by Jenny Keller: TX772 .K39 2019

“A fascinating read full of delicious detail. Claire Stewart explores the diversity of American wedding food and wedding feast traditions.” (Vicki Howard, visiting fellow, University of Essex)

As Long As We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts by Claire Stewart: GT2690 .S74 2017

“What a joy this is for hungry readers everywhere: stylish, fun and clever. If there is comfort food, there is also comfort reading, and The Little Library Cookbook is it.” (Bee Wilson)

The Little Library Cookbook: 100 Recipes from Your Favorite Books by Kate Young: TX714 .Y687 2017

The Big Book of Amazing Cakes brings the magic of The Great British Baking Show to your kitchen with easy-to-follow recipes for every shape, size and delicious flavor of cake you can imagine.

The Great British Baking Show: The Big Book of Amazing Cakes by The Baking Show Team: TX771 .B535 2019

Welcome to the amazing world of pigfiteroles in mud, koala macarons, and the enchanting cat paradise cake… It’s time to infuse your baking with a sprinkle of glitter and a menagerie of cute creatures with the help of Kim-Joy–finalist on Great British Bake Off and America’s Great British Baking Show!

Baking with Kim-Joy: Cute and Creative Bakes to Make You Smile by Kim-Joy: TX771 .B355 2019

December 2019 CHILDREN'S BOOKS

Fly!

By Mark Teague
Call Number: PIC TEA
View in IvyCat

Mama bird wants Baby bird to learn to fly so he can migrate with the rest of the flock, but Baby bird would rather go by hot air balloon or car instead.

Home in the Woods

By Eliza Wheeler
Call Number: PIC WHE
View in IvyCat

During the Great Depression six-year-old Marvel, her seven siblings, and their mother find a tar-paper shack in the woods and, over the course of a year, turn it into a home.

16 Words: William Carlos Williams & “The Red Wheelbarrow”

By Lisa Rogers
Call Number: PS3545 .I544 Z876 2019
View in IvyCat

This is the story of great American poet William Carlos Williams and how being mindful can result in the creation of a great poem like “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

Just in Case You Want to Fly

By Julie Fogliano
Call Number: PIC FOG
View in IvyCat

Just in case you want to fly, here’s some wind, and here’s the sky.

It’s a Round, Round World!

By Ellie Peterson
Call Number: QB286 .P48 2019
View in IvyCat

Join intrepid young scientist-adventurer, Joulia Copernicus as she takes readers on a historical journey through time and space.

Bruce’s Big Fun Day

By Ryan T. Higgins
Call Number: PIC HIG
View in IvyCat

Nibbs the mouse wants to give Bruce the bear a Big Fun Day, but unfortunately grumpy Bruce does not like fun.

Mr. Scruff

By Simon James
Call Number: PIC JAM
View in IvyCat

Poor Mr. Scruff, alone in the rescue shelter, doesn’t belong to anyone. Jim and Mr. Scruff don’t look anything alike, and their names certainly don’t rhyme, but they may end up belonging to each other just the same.

Universal Human Rights Month

Following the atrocities of the Second World War, precedents were set to prevent a third. On December 10, 1948, the United Nations General Assembly codified one such precedent: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document consists of 30 articles intended to define and represent the rights and dignity everyone is entitled to share.

In 2001, the anniversary of the declaration was expanded into a week-long holiday. In recent years, that holiday grew to span the entire month of December. Ideally, the declaration would foster a year-round practice. Until then, even when faced with opposition, consider representing the best in all of us by embracing our shared humanity. After all, we already know that–regardless of our race, religion, culture, or beliefs–more is shared between us than divides.

Further Reading:

Documents used to draft the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union
Celebrating its 10th anniversary December 1, 2019!

Global Bioethics and Human Rights: contemporary issues
Available at Ivy Tech Fort Wayne Library!

The Paris Agreement : climate change, solidarity, and human rights
Find more eBooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

Taking Sides in Peacekeeping: impartiality and the future of the United Nations
Request this and other books found at Ivy Tech libraries outside Fort Wayne here with our Interlibrary Loan service!


A Brief Guide to Help Finish Your Paper

Imagine, if you will, you have a paper due tomorrow. The paper will not only decide whether you pass the class; the class is contingent upon your graduation. To make matters worse, despite your desperate situation, the paper’s subject only encourages you to procrastinate, and you have convinced yourself that the increasing pressure to finish will help you focus in the two hours before the paper needs to be submitted. Maybe your situation is not this dire, but it may feel that way. Here are some tips to make starting or finishing a little less panic inducing.

  1. As long as it is within the boundaries of your assignment, write the paper that would capture your attention. Keep it academic, but take liberties; tell a story with your thesis; get creative. Think about why you are not connecting to the subject and use your perspective as a way to critically analyze the topic.
  2. Collect your sources ahead of time. Even if you have yet to write anything else, add all the references you intend to include in your paper. Think about how each reference supports your thesis and organize them accordingly throughout what will be your introduction, body, and conclusion. All you would need to do is then combine and support each with your own ideas.
  3. Remember how relieved you were when you last finished a paper? The final product might have even impressed you. It was not a fluke. The same prospects apply this time. Don’t let pressure cloud your impression. You wrote that paper, and you will do it again.

If preparation is less of a problem for you, but you would like to improve your writing, the following titles might interest you. Thanks to the library’s collection of eBooks, you do not even need to leave the comfort of your home to benefit from our selection.

10 Steps to Successful Business Writing, 2nd Edition
The Student Guide to Writing
Seven Steps to Confident Writing
Writing Fantastic Fiction

Find those and other books on any academic subject you need through Ivy Tech Library’s catalog database, IvyCat!

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

This November, please join us in celebrating Native American heritage!

Help us tell all Americans’ stories. Of the many Native Americans spotlighted at Ivy Tech Library, the three below are often regarded as exceptional. Stop by this month to collect one of their bookmarks!

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
U.S. Senator

Born in 1933 of a Portuguese immigrant mother and Northern Cheyenne father, Campbell is one of 44 chiefs of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. He earned a degree in physical education and fine arts after serving in the U.S. Air force from 1951-1953. He served in the Colorado State Legislature before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1987. He won his bid to become a senator in 1992 and won re-election in 1998.

Henry, C. Ben Nighthorse Campbell: Cheyenne Chief and U.S. Senator. Broomall, PA: Chelsea House, 1994.

Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina

From 1947 to 1960, Maria Tallchief performed with the New York City Ballet, gaining prima ballerina status. Later she danced with the American Ballet Theatre, returning to the New York City Ballet in 1963 until her retirement in 1965. But she didn’t retire from dance. She directed the Lyric Opera Ballet of Chicago and founded the Chicago City Ballet in 1981. She was the latter’s artistic director through 1987.

Tallchief, Maria and Kaplan, L. Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Winona LaDuke
Activist, Author

A member of the Anishinaabeg (Ojibew) tribe, Winona LaDuke’s activism dates back to her teens. At age 18 she spoke before the United Nations about Indian issues. While at Harvard earning an economics degree, she worked with grassroots Native American organizations in various states. After graduation, she moved to the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, where she lives today with her family.

LaDuke, Winona. All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 1999. Ms. Magazine, April/May 2001, pp. 46-53.

Find the following eBooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

I am where I come from: Native American college students and graduates tell their life stories

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture

Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

Follow the official celebration here: