Tag Archives: Culinary

How to Roast Everything

9781945256226_p0_v4_s550x406

A Game-Changing Guide to Building Flavor in Meat, Vegetables, and More. 

Call number: TX 690 .H69 2018  View record in IvyCat

“The first cookbook devoted to the art and science of roasting from America’s Test Kitchen, pulling together decades of test kitchen experience and knowledge in one place” (publisher). Designed as a master class in roasting, each of the 175+ recipes includes a “Why this recipe works” feature explaining the cooking process. Wholesale cuts of meat and their attributes are explained, along with safe handling and storage practices. An extensive section on roasting vegetables and fruits is included, and many dressings as well. A chapter on using charcoal or gas grills extends the versatility of this book. Includes metric conversions and index.

Light up December

Welcome to December, the darkest month of the year in the northern hemisphere. It’s not surprising that all cultures and traditions in this area have celebrations involving lights or fires and feasting. We have displays of cookbooks from our extensive collection that you can check out for your holiday cooking.

Our December graduates will surely shine brightly on all around them. We wish them all the best as they leave us. Special thanks to our wonderful library student assistant Cassondra.

New Products in the Library include the Testing and Education Reference Center database. It has practice entrance exam questions for public safety jobs, for Accounting certification, Teacher Praxis exams, the GED, SAT, CLEP, LSAT, and many more. Also included are tools for assessing career choices, writing your resume, and interviewing.

GFCLearnFree is a resource that we’d like to reintroduce. This portal contains hundreds of free training tools for students and really any adult trying to function in the USA. Improve your computer keyboarding and mousing, understand how Excel spreadsheets work, get an overview of using social media tools, reading a transit map, and so much more.

Chocolate

 

As we make our way toward the tail-end of this rather mild winter, you may find yourself celebrating Valentine’s Day. For different couples, this day has various associations. Perhaps it’s an excuse for a romantic getaway. Maybe it’s a vibrant bouquet of flowers to dispel the winter’s dreariness. Or, if you’re anything like me, it’s all about the chocolate. Is it any wonder that we give this delicious, unique, and versatile treat away as a sign of our affection? Let’s dig a bit deeper into the world of chocolate, using the resources available in the Ivy Tech Northeast Library, to help understand what makes this confection so special.

A world without chocolate sounds like a dark place, but depending on where your ancestors hail from, that may have been the case. Made from the seeds of the cacao tree, chocolate was known for centuries as a treat, usually in the form of a drink, to Central American civilizations such as the Maya and the Aztecs. While we have come to associate the food with chocolatiers from Switzerland or Belgium, chocolate didn’t hit European shores until the Spanish conquistador Cortés encountered it during his New World exploration in the 16th century. As this Modern Marvels segment, available from the Films on Demand database, points out, chocolate as we know really came to be in 1828 when Dutch chocolate maker C.J. Van Houten created a press that allowed for the processing of cacao seeds into a dry powder, which in turn allowed in to be pressed into bars or baked into all the delectable treats we know it for today.

Since this development, the uses for chocolate have become many and varied, from the simplest bite-sized chocolate bar to the most elaborate cakes and pastries. The book Chocolate Passion from Tish Boyle and Timothy Moriarty is chock-full of “choc”-full recipes that feature the ingredient in delightful ways. For something relatively simple, the “Pain au Chocolat” is the perfect treat. The light, flaky croissant crust is the perfect way to deliver a rich, melted chocolate filling. If you’re feeling a bit more daring, try the unique fusion of flavors in “Ganache-filled Fried Wontons with Ginger Ice Cream and Chocolate Sorbet.” This recipe teaches you how to make everything, from the ice cream itself made with fresh ginger, to the ganache filling with bittersweet chocolate and cognac. The “Asian-spiced Dipping Sauce,” with its cinnamon, cloves, and anise is a perfect example of the many flavors that can complement and enhance your chocolate eating experience.

If you’re looking for something solely chocolate-focused, try Lisa Yockelson’s “Chocolate Savannahs, Remodeled” from her appropriately Chocolate Chocolate. As Yockelson describes, “The intense flavor reaches a chocolatey plateau in the dough through use of cocoa powder, bittersweet chocolate, unsweetened chocolate, and chocolate chips in the dough.” I’ll take a dozen.

Are you a diagnosed chocaholic? Ok, that may be a made-up condition, but our curiosity about chocolate from a health standpoint is definitely real. From the MedlinePlus database, an article from the National Institutes of Health entitled “Claims about Cocoa: Can Chocolate Really Be Good for You?” explores the various health claims about chocolate and its place in our diet. It details an interesting study about the Kuna people off the coast of Panama whose low risk of cardiovascular disease and blood pressure was found to be inconsistent with their salt intake and weight. Could this be good genetics? Not likely. The article also states that “those who moved away from the Kuna islands developed high blood pressure and heart disease at typical rate.” One unique aspect of their diet that piqued the interest of researchers was the fact that, as Dr. Brent M. Egan said, the amount of cocoa they consume “was easily 10 times more than most of us would get in a typical day.” Of course, this doesn’t mean you should stock up on Hershey’s bars for daily consumption. The Kuna’s chocolate is much closer to the original way that humans consumed it, a drink made from crushed and dried cacao pods that we would probably find much too bitter. Some researchers have tried to find links between chocolate and preventing disease such as diabetes or cancer, but it’s difficult to determine correlation with something as complex as diet, and almost impossible to declare causation. Even if chocolate helps stave off diabetes, most of the chocolate we eat as Americans is delivered in a way that is high in sugar and fat, which almost certainly does more harm than good. Going with darker, less processed chocolates—ideally paired with healthy foods such as fruits and nuts—seems to be the way to go. This is because a compound called flavonols are thought to be responsible for the health benefits of chocolate. Often flavonols, along with the more bitter taste that accompanies them, are removed the more cocoa is processed. By the time that cocoa makes its way into your slice of triple chocolate cheesecake, you probably shouldn’t consider it a health food. We haven’t yet reached a consensus on exactly what the health benefits of chocolate are, but as long as you’re watching the sugar and fat that accompany it, you may very well be doing your body a favor.

Are you going to enjoy any chocolate this month? There’s no wrong way to do so, and with so many interesting flavor combinations, you’ll never run out of interesting and flavorful ways to try this delicious ingredient. If you need more ideas about how to get more chocolate in your life, make sure to stop by the Ivy Tech Northeast Library and get inspired. (By Library Clerk, David Winn)

The Wonders of Chocolate DVD

Experience the amazing and delectable delights of chocolate… Plunge your senses into the world of master chocolatier Patrick Roger–from the lab where this audacious artist creates his luxurious chocolate gems, to Ecuador and the source of the finest quality beans. Meet pastry chef Thierry, whose cocoa-coated gourmet universe produces textures and flavors to seduce and surprise the palate-cocoa spring rolls, chocolate bonbons with foie gras… Discover the health benefits of chocolate, from anti-aging serums to treatments for cavities and even cancer! A truly wondrous decadence.

Holiday Food


For many, the holidays come with a familiar set of sensory memories that put us back into the mindset of past merrymaking. We hear the jingling of bells and the crackling of a warm fire. We smell pine and juniper, or cocoa warming on the stove. We feel the kiss of snowflakes on our cheeks as we arrive at the homes of loved ones, ready to share in the celebrations that accompany the season. Of course, no holiday would be complete without the sense of taste. The end-of-the-year culinary traditions bring a whole host of experiences that we’ve come to associate with celebration. Here are a few sources for spicing up your holiday fare.

Gatherings & Celebrations : History, Folklore, Rituals and Recipes for the Occasions that Bring People Together
Gatherings and Celebrations by Burt Wolf is a unique international exploration of holidays and food. Wolf pairs each holiday with a geographical region and then gives a bit of history about the holiday, the customs observed, and which kinds of dishes are frequently served. In the “Christmas in Germany” chapter, he describes the German Pfefferkuchen, spice cakes made with pepper dating back to medieval times and Spekulatius, hard gingerbread prepared in the likeness of St. Nicholas. Each section also has its respective set of recipes, and those wanting to try a German-style Christmas celebration can try the Roast Christmas Goose, Riesling Soup, or Red Wine Spiced Cabbage

To Every Season : A Family Holiday Cookbook
If you find yourself with kids who want to help out in the kitchen, Jane Zalben’s To Every Season: A Family Holiday Cookbook is a good collection of holiday favorites with simple, but delicious ingredients. If you’re celebrating Hanukkah, Pearl’s Potato Latkes are fun to fry together. For celebrants of Kwanzaa, Sweet Potato Pudding is a simple, sweet treat that will give your whole kitchen a festive aroma. For a fun project that will show off everyone’s artistic side, you can try Spiced and Iced Gingerbread Animals that the little ones will enjoy making just as much as eating.

Mr. Food Test Kitchen Christmas Made Easy : Recipes, Tips and Edible Gifts for a Stress-free Holiday
Holidays are times of joy, but they can also be stressful. We don’t all have hours to spend in the kitchen. Luckily, the Mr. Food Test Kitchen has your back with Christmas Made Easy : Recipes, Tips and Edible Gifts for a Stress-Free Holiday. This book offers many recipes that you can prepare in advance and heat when you’re about to serve. The Strawberry Breakfast Rollups are the perfect warm treat for a cold winter morning. There are also many recipes that are as easy to prepare as casseroles, but will still spice up the menu for a special holiday treat, such as the Ravioli Pesto Pie and Garden Sloppy Joes. Sometimes all it takes is a little inspiration to make an easy recipe into a holiday family favorite.

A Country Music Christmas : Christmas Songs, Memories, Family Photographs and Recipes from America’s Favorite Country and Gospel Stars
For something a little different, why not add the strum of a guitar into your Christmas celebration? A Country Music Christmas is a collection of family photos, memories, and recipes from a whole host of country legends. Make sure you grab the accompanying CD to put on while you prepare Alan Jackson’s Chattahoochee Cornbread and Cornbread Dressing, Willie Nelson’s Always on My Mind Biscuits and Chocolate Gravy with Cocoa, or Dolly Parton’s Jolly Cheesecake Pudding. If you and your family love country music, this is the perfect combination to celebrate the holidays.

No matter how you and yours celebrate the holiday season, we here at the Ivy Tech Northeast Library wish everyone a happy, safe, and sane season. Season’s greetings!

Sugar & spice : sweets and treats from around the world / by Gaitri Pagrach-Chandra ; photography by Yuki Sugiura.

Call number: TX783 .P343 2012

A delicious collection of international recipes from the award-winning author of Warm Bread and Honey Cake… This enchanting cookbook offers recipes for the best of the world’s sweets, tiny cakes and patisserie, from Indian milk sweets to the nutty filo dainties of the Middle East; from tiny French sponge cakes to Scottish fudge. Alongside over 120 easy-to-follow recipes, the author offers engaging narratives on the history of sweets—tales of trade and sea voyages that have enchanted children for centuries. All the sweets and cakes can be eaten in one or two mouthfuls—ideal for the family, entertaining, or gifts. Sugar and Spice is filled with stories from around the world and it is as much an armchair read as a practical cookbook. With beautiful photography and delectable design it makes the book itself an ideal gift and will be as much a treat as the recipes themselves. (From B&N)

Love me, feed me : sharing with your dog the everyday good food you cook and enjoy / by Judith Jones

Call number: SF427.4 .J66 2014

From the esteemed food editor and author Judith Jones, a charming, practical guide to sharing the pleasures of home cooking with your dog.
Doesn’t man’s best friend deserve a little more than cardboard-dry kibble day in and day out? Judith Jones thinks so, and in this delightful new cookbook she offers up more than fifty home-cooked recipes, both time efficient and finance friendly—among them Salmon Cakes, Wild Mushroom Risotto, and Shepherd’s Pie—that she’s loved and shared with her own canines.
Jones explains the nutritional benefits of substituting, or supplementing, store-bought food with a diet of fresh, home-prepared ingredients. She offers helpful extras like advice on portion size, what to do with scraps, and the latest research on controversial ingredients such as garlic (newly vindicated), ginger (use sparingly), and eggplant (an acquired taste, but scrape out the seeds). Though many of the recipes are simple to prepare, using basic techniques and ingredients home cooks are likely to have on hand, Jones never compromises flavor or variety; when a full recipe—her mouth-watering Moussaka, for instance—is too complex for a dog’s palate or digestive health, Jones gives detailed instructions on how to modify your pet’s share.
Jones balances her recipes, tips, and techniques with endearing accounts of life with her own dogs, including her very first, a Scottish terrier; a poodle who charmed a French chef into serving up a haute-cuisine feast gratis; and her current Havanese pup, Mabon, who occasionally contributes his own two cents within these pages. She also includes the thoughts of some of her canine- and food-loving friends, Jacques Pépin and M. F. K. Fisher among them. With Love Me, Feed Me to guide you, planning what to put in your dog’s bowl becomes a natural part of deciding what to put on your own table, and your dog will savor mealtimes all the more because of it.
Filled with the practical wisdom and verve of a master home cook and lifetime dog lover, Love Me, Feed Me can only lead to a happier, healthier dog. (From B&N)