Tag Archives: Culinary

Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis

9781538106976

By Robyn Griggs Lawrence, best-selling author of The Cannabis Cookbook

Call number: TX 819 .M25 L38 2019

View record in IvyCat

Intended for culinary research; also useful for written and oral presentations on the topic of marijuana legalization and medicinal use. “A comprehensive history of cannabis as a unique culinary ingredient, from ancient India and Persia to today’s explosive new market. Cannabis, the hottest new global food trend, has been providing humans with nutrition, medicine, and solace […] since the earliest cavepeople discovered its powers. In colorful detail, the book explores the debate over the cannabis plant’s taxonomy and nomenclature, then follows as it co-evolves with humans throughout history, beloved by the masses, reviled by the elite, and shrouded in conflict and secrecy. […] Along the way, Robyn Griggs Lawrence explores the medicinal qualities of cannabis and its resurgence as a both a recreational drug and a respite from various illnesses and ailments. With recipes and stories throughout, this work is sure to entertain and inform readers about the history of cannabis as an edible ingredient in a variety of foods.” — Publisher

Never Home Alone

97815416457451From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live

By Rob Dunn

Call Number: QH309 .D866 2018

View in IvyCat

Just in time for mud season, we have acquired this best-selling science book. It is a fun read, and contains relevant information for our agriculture, biology, building construction, culinary, health sciences, and HVAC-R programs. Rob Dunn is a rigorous scientist who writes in an engaging style about his research, revealing how simple curiosity can advance knowledge. There are so many astonishing facts in this “natural history of where we live,” that readers will be transported back to a childlike appreciation for creepy-crawlies. Dunn also walks  through the history of microbiology as he investigates water pipes, air systems, construction materials, kitchens, and the bodies of humans and their pets. There is a good dose of social history, too, as he considers how science has changed the way we live – not always for the better. His frank admission of what biologists don’t know yet will inspire budding scientists.

March is Frozen Food Month

An email from the Census Bureau alerted us that March is “Frozen Food Month.” Frozen food is easy to cook, but a complex topic. The frozen food industry was born in the USA and continues to develop globally, involving agriculture, food science, logistics, and refrigeration engineering – all subjects taught here at Ivy Tech Fort Wayne.

Frozen foods have both responded to, and influenced, our culture; from the way we cook to our transportation infrastructure. The contribution of this industry to our economy is massive. We have assembled some statistics in our library displays marking this month.

Tucked in among the charts, books, and journals are some themed treats, while supplies last … and yes, you can chew gum at the computers!

 

How to Roast Everything

9781945256226_p0_v4_s550x406

A Game-Changing Guide to Building Flavor in Meat, Vegetables, and More. 

Call number: TX 690 .H69 2018  View record in IvyCat

“The first cookbook devoted to the art and science of roasting from America’s Test Kitchen, pulling together decades of test kitchen experience and knowledge in one place” (publisher). Designed as a master class in roasting, each of the 175+ recipes includes a “Why this recipe works” feature explaining the cooking process. Wholesale cuts of meat and their attributes are explained, along with safe handling and storage practices. An extensive section on roasting vegetables and fruits is included, and many dressings as well. A chapter on using charcoal or gas grills extends the versatility of this book. Includes metric conversions and index.

Light up December

Welcome to December, the darkest month of the year in the northern hemisphere. It’s not surprising that all cultures and traditions in this area have celebrations involving lights or fires and feasting. We have displays of cookbooks from our extensive collection that you can check out for your holiday cooking.

Our December graduates will surely shine brightly on all around them. We wish them all the best as they leave us. Special thanks to our wonderful library student assistant Cassondra.

New Products in the Library include the Testing and Education Reference Center database. It has practice entrance exam questions for public safety jobs, for Accounting certification, Teacher Praxis exams, the GED, SAT, CLEP, LSAT, and many more. Also included are tools for assessing career choices, writing your resume, and interviewing.

GFCLearnFree is a resource that we’d like to reintroduce. This portal contains hundreds of free training tools for students and really any adult trying to function in the USA. Improve your computer keyboarding and mousing, understand how Excel spreadsheets work, get an overview of using social media tools, reading a transit map, and so much more.

Chocolate

 

As we make our way toward the tail-end of this rather mild winter, you may find yourself celebrating Valentine’s Day. For different couples, this day has various associations. Perhaps it’s an excuse for a romantic getaway. Maybe it’s a vibrant bouquet of flowers to dispel the winter’s dreariness. Or, if you’re anything like me, it’s all about the chocolate. Is it any wonder that we give this delicious, unique, and versatile treat away as a sign of our affection? Let’s dig a bit deeper into the world of chocolate, using the resources available in the Ivy Tech Northeast Library, to help understand what makes this confection so special.

A world without chocolate sounds like a dark place, but depending on where your ancestors hail from, that may have been the case. Made from the seeds of the cacao tree, chocolate was known for centuries as a treat, usually in the form of a drink, to Central American civilizations such as the Maya and the Aztecs. While we have come to associate the food with chocolatiers from Switzerland or Belgium, chocolate didn’t hit European shores until the Spanish conquistador Cortés encountered it during his New World exploration in the 16th century. As this Modern Marvels segment, available from the Films on Demand database, points out, chocolate as we know really came to be in 1828 when Dutch chocolate maker C.J. Van Houten created a press that allowed for the processing of cacao seeds into a dry powder, which in turn allowed in to be pressed into bars or baked into all the delectable treats we know it for today.

Since this development, the uses for chocolate have become many and varied, from the simplest bite-sized chocolate bar to the most elaborate cakes and pastries. The book Chocolate Passion from Tish Boyle and Timothy Moriarty is chock-full of “choc”-full recipes that feature the ingredient in delightful ways. For something relatively simple, the “Pain au Chocolat” is the perfect treat. The light, flaky croissant crust is the perfect way to deliver a rich, melted chocolate filling. If you’re feeling a bit more daring, try the unique fusion of flavors in “Ganache-filled Fried Wontons with Ginger Ice Cream and Chocolate Sorbet.” This recipe teaches you how to make everything, from the ice cream itself made with fresh ginger, to the ganache filling with bittersweet chocolate and cognac. The “Asian-spiced Dipping Sauce,” with its cinnamon, cloves, and anise is a perfect example of the many flavors that can complement and enhance your chocolate eating experience.

If you’re looking for something solely chocolate-focused, try Lisa Yockelson’s “Chocolate Savannahs, Remodeled” from her appropriately Chocolate Chocolate. As Yockelson describes, “The intense flavor reaches a chocolatey plateau in the dough through use of cocoa powder, bittersweet chocolate, unsweetened chocolate, and chocolate chips in the dough.” I’ll take a dozen.

Are you a diagnosed chocaholic? Ok, that may be a made-up condition, but our curiosity about chocolate from a health standpoint is definitely real. From the MedlinePlus database, an article from the National Institutes of Health entitled “Claims about Cocoa: Can Chocolate Really Be Good for You?” explores the various health claims about chocolate and its place in our diet. It details an interesting study about the Kuna people off the coast of Panama whose low risk of cardiovascular disease and blood pressure was found to be inconsistent with their salt intake and weight. Could this be good genetics? Not likely. The article also states that “those who moved away from the Kuna islands developed high blood pressure and heart disease at typical rate.” One unique aspect of their diet that piqued the interest of researchers was the fact that, as Dr. Brent M. Egan said, the amount of cocoa they consume “was easily 10 times more than most of us would get in a typical day.” Of course, this doesn’t mean you should stock up on Hershey’s bars for daily consumption. The Kuna’s chocolate is much closer to the original way that humans consumed it, a drink made from crushed and dried cacao pods that we would probably find much too bitter. Some researchers have tried to find links between chocolate and preventing disease such as diabetes or cancer, but it’s difficult to determine correlation with something as complex as diet, and almost impossible to declare causation. Even if chocolate helps stave off diabetes, most of the chocolate we eat as Americans is delivered in a way that is high in sugar and fat, which almost certainly does more harm than good. Going with darker, less processed chocolates—ideally paired with healthy foods such as fruits and nuts—seems to be the way to go. This is because a compound called flavonols are thought to be responsible for the health benefits of chocolate. Often flavonols, along with the more bitter taste that accompanies them, are removed the more cocoa is processed. By the time that cocoa makes its way into your slice of triple chocolate cheesecake, you probably shouldn’t consider it a health food. We haven’t yet reached a consensus on exactly what the health benefits of chocolate are, but as long as you’re watching the sugar and fat that accompany it, you may very well be doing your body a favor.

Are you going to enjoy any chocolate this month? There’s no wrong way to do so, and with so many interesting flavor combinations, you’ll never run out of interesting and flavorful ways to try this delicious ingredient. If you need more ideas about how to get more chocolate in your life, make sure to stop by the Ivy Tech Northeast Library and get inspired. (By Library Clerk, David Winn)

The Wonders of Chocolate DVD

Experience the amazing and delectable delights of chocolate… Plunge your senses into the world of master chocolatier Patrick Roger–from the lab where this audacious artist creates his luxurious chocolate gems, to Ecuador and the source of the finest quality beans. Meet pastry chef Thierry, whose cocoa-coated gourmet universe produces textures and flavors to seduce and surprise the palate-cocoa spring rolls, chocolate bonbons with foie gras… Discover the health benefits of chocolate, from anti-aging serums to treatments for cavities and even cancer! A truly wondrous decadence.