Tag Archives: Displays

National Ethics Awareness Month

No matter your area of study or line of work, ethics have an effect on policies, principles, and behavior. As an official observance, National Ethics Awareness Month draws attention to how crucial the ongoing study and practice of ethical engagement is.

Modernity comes with unforeseen dilemmas that shape the way we experience the world. Ethics takes a practical approach in exploring humane and sensible solutions to otherwise unavoidable and irreconcilable problems.

Ivy Tech offers a number of classes that take exclusive looks at ethics through the lens of many different disciplines:

PHIL 102: Introduction to Ethics
LEGS 170: Legal Ethics
TMAS 120: Ethics and Massage Management
BUSN 120: Ethics and Social Responsibility
CRIM 201: Ethics in Criminal Justice
HLHS 105: Medical Law and Ethics
HUMS 220: Issues and Ethics in Human Services

More information on these classes and more can be found here: https://www.ivytech.edu/course-catalog/.

The library has also curated a small collection of our books to further showcase National Ethics Awareness Month. Please stop by to not only find which dilemmas most apply to your life but to also discover if you can contribute to their resolutions!

In honor of this month’s observance, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

Black History and The Vote

The 15th amendment was ratified 150 years ago today, but it was not until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that black women shared a voice with black men at the voting booth. At the time of the Act’s passing there were only six African-American representatives in the House, while there was only one Senator. Today, representation has improved in the House, but there are still only three black Senators.

This Black History Month officially recognizes challenges faced and the barriers that remain between black voices and representation. Less overt than previous iterations of oppression, voter suppression in the form of gerrymandering, draconian voter ID laws, and the dissemination of misinformation subvert the potential resolution of issues faced by the black community.

The library has prepared some resources for students to further explore Black History and the Vote. Be sure to stop by and check out a book or two! In honor of this month’s observance and celebration, our eBook Spotlight recognizes “African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965.” You can find that title and a wide selection of others on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog, Ivycat!

New Year, New Possibilities

It is only 2 days into the new year, but that might as well be 2 months when committing to new habits. Whether or not you have already delayed your resolution for another taste, one thing is for sure: There is no need to let personal investments hinge on the ceremony of an arbitrary calendar day. We’ve curated a small collection of books that might help your expectations and goals cooperate longer than you do with that last slice of vice. Get a jump on the upcoming semester and stop by Fort Wayne Ivy Tech Library today to explore both your personal and academic possibilities!

Universal Human Rights Month

Following the atrocities of the Second World War, precedents were set to prevent a third. On December 10, 1948, the United Nations General Assembly codified one such precedent: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document consists of 30 articles intended to define and represent the rights and dignity everyone is entitled to share.

In 2001, the anniversary of the declaration was expanded into a week-long holiday. In recent years, that holiday grew to span the entire month of December. Ideally, the declaration would foster a year-round practice. Until then, even when faced with opposition, consider representing the best in all of us by embracing our shared humanity. After all, we already know that–regardless of our race, religion, culture, or beliefs–more is shared between us than divides.

Further Reading:

Documents used to draft the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union
Celebrating its 10th anniversary December 1, 2019!

Global Bioethics and Human Rights: contemporary issues
Available at Ivy Tech Fort Wayne Library!

The Paris Agreement : climate change, solidarity, and human rights
Find more eBooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

Taking Sides in Peacekeeping: impartiality and the future of the United Nations
Request this and other books found at Ivy Tech libraries outside Fort Wayne here with our Interlibrary Loan service!


NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

This November, please join us in celebrating Native American heritage!

Help us tell all Americans’ stories. Of the many Native Americans spotlighted at Ivy Tech Library, the three below are often regarded as exceptional. Stop by this month to collect one of their bookmarks!

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
U.S. Senator

Born in 1933 of a Portuguese immigrant mother and Northern Cheyenne father, Campbell is one of 44 chiefs of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. He earned a degree in physical education and fine arts after serving in the U.S. Air force from 1951-1953. He served in the Colorado State Legislature before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1987. He won his bid to become a senator in 1992 and won re-election in 1998.

Henry, C. Ben Nighthorse Campbell: Cheyenne Chief and U.S. Senator. Broomall, PA: Chelsea House, 1994.

Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina

From 1947 to 1960, Maria Tallchief performed with the New York City Ballet, gaining prima ballerina status. Later she danced with the American Ballet Theatre, returning to the New York City Ballet in 1963 until her retirement in 1965. But she didn’t retire from dance. She directed the Lyric Opera Ballet of Chicago and founded the Chicago City Ballet in 1981. She was the latter’s artistic director through 1987.

Tallchief, Maria and Kaplan, L. Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Winona LaDuke
Activist, Author

A member of the Anishinaabeg (Ojibew) tribe, Winona LaDuke’s activism dates back to her teens. At age 18 she spoke before the United Nations about Indian issues. While at Harvard earning an economics degree, she worked with grassroots Native American organizations in various states. After graduation, she moved to the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, where she lives today with her family.

LaDuke, Winona. All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 1999. Ms. Magazine, April/May 2001, pp. 46-53.

Find the following eBooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

I am where I come from: Native American college students and graduates tell their life stories

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture

Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

Follow the official celebration here:

Spirits of Fort Wayne

How will you be remembered?  This October, the Ivy Tech Library calls upon the departed influential Fort Wayne residents to tell their stories. 

Meet Alice Hamilton, a medical doctor from the early 20th century, whose advocacy for workers’ rights proved crucial in industrial poison legislation. Consider Frances Slocum, known as an 18th century Delaware captive, who later in life leveraged her story to prevent the removal of her adopted community from Indiana. You are likely already familiar with Philo Farnsworth and Carole Lombard, but what about Henry Cannady, who selflessly helped former slaves escape through the Underground Railroad?

Many irreplaceable community members are those whose stories demand reevaluation of norms taken for granted, lives buried by nefarious or apathetic forces.  Whose voice would you resurrect?  Who would you give peace?  Who would you condemn?  Find them all at Ivy Tech Library.

Changing Hours

Our Saturday hours are changing! On September 30th, we will begin opening at 9:00 a.m. and stay open until 1:45 p.m.

We have several new displays. A selection of books relevant to Hispanic Heritage Month are laid out near our north door for you to browse. They include Sonia Sotomayor’s best-selling My Beloved World.  You can check these out, too, right off the table!

Banned Books Week is September 25th -30th this year. We will have shelves of these dangerous items available for you to check out – they are part of our collections.

On our bulletin board outside our south door we are showcasing resources for courses in the School of Business, Logistics & Supply Chain. Did you know we have a dedicated Business Plan Pro workstation in the Library? Plus dozens of recent eBooks and hundreds of specialized articles.

While preparing this display I was temporarily captivated by logistics because there are so many recent innovations in this field. We’ve all heard of GPS but have you used an IPS – indoor positioning system? They are used in malls and other large spaces with many rooms. Each room or area has a transmitter using Bluetooth, WiFi or other medium; and with an app you can be directed to that specific place within the building. Wouldn’t an IPS have made those first days of classes much easier?

I recently read an article by the CMO of What3Words, a company that is providing addresses for the entire world. (Giles Rhys Jones, “Human Friendly Coordinates.” Geoinformatics, vol. 18, no. 5, 2016, pp. 10-12.) What3Words mapped the entire earth into 3-meter squares and assigned each a three-word address. Humans tend to mix up numbers – especially the long ones used by GPS systems – but research shows we can recall three random words. (They are indeed random with no connection to the purpose or neighborhood of the space so tagged.) The words are translated into local languages worldwide. This system has revolutionized humanitarian aid delivery and is allowing civil, legal, and financial services to reach communities that have been underserved. The What3Words app is free for iOS or Android, and the system now has many partners.

See you at dusty.puzzle.ritual!