Tag Archives: Displays

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

This November, please join us in celebrating Native American heritage!

Help us tell all Americans’ stories. Of the many Native Americans spotlighted at Ivy Tech Library, the three below are often regarded as exceptional. Stop by this month to collect one of their bookmarks!

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
U.S. Senator

Born in 1933 of a Portuguese immigrant mother and Northern Cheyenne father, Campbell is one of 44 chiefs of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. He earned a degree in physical education and fine arts after serving in the U.S. Air force from 1951-1953. He served in the Colorado State Legislature before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1987. He won his bid to become a senator in 1992 and won re-election in 1998.

Henry, C. Ben Nighthorse Campbell: Cheyenne Chief and U.S. Senator. Broomall, PA: Chelsea House, 1994.

Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina

From 1947 to 1960, Maria Tallchief performed with the New York City Ballet, gaining prima ballerina status. Later she danced with the American Ballet Theatre, returning to the New York City Ballet in 1963 until her retirement in 1965. But she didn’t retire from dance. She directed the Lyric Opera Ballet of Chicago and founded the Chicago City Ballet in 1981. She was the latter’s artistic director through 1987.

Tallchief, Maria and Kaplan, L. Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Winona LaDuke
Activist, Author

A member of the Anishinaabeg (Ojibew) tribe, Winona LaDuke’s activism dates back to her teens. At age 18 she spoke before the United Nations about Indian issues. While at Harvard earning an economics degree, she worked with grassroots Native American organizations in various states. After graduation, she moved to the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, where she lives today with her family.

LaDuke, Winona. All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 1999. Ms. Magazine, April/May 2001, pp. 46-53.

Find the following ebooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

I am where I come from: Native American college students and graduates tell their life stories

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture

Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

Follow the official celebration here:

Spirits of Fort Wayne

How will you be remembered?  This October, the Ivy Tech Library calls upon the departed influential Fort Wayne residents to tell their stories. 

Meet Alice Hamilton, a medical doctor from the early 20th century, whose advocacy for workers’ rights proved crucial in industrial poison legislation. Consider Frances Slocum, known as an 18th century Delaware captive, who later in life leveraged her story to prevent the removal of her adopted community from Indiana. You are likely already familiar with Philo Farnsworth and Carole Lombard, but what about Henry Cannady, who selflessly helped former slaves escape through the Underground Railroad?

Many irreplaceable community members are those whose stories demand reevaluation of norms taken for granted, lives buried by nefarious or apathetic forces.  Whose voice would you resurrect?  Who would you give peace?  Who would you condemn?  Find them all at Ivy Tech Library.

Changing Hours

Our Saturday hours are changing! On September 30th, we will begin opening at 9:00 a.m. and stay open until 1:45 p.m.

We have several new displays. A selection of books relevant to Hispanic Heritage Month are laid out near our north door for you to browse. They include Sonia Sotomayor’s best-selling My Beloved World.  You can check these out, too, right off the table!

Banned Books Week is September 25th -30th this year. We will have shelves of these dangerous items available for you to check out – they are part of our collections.

On our bulletin board outside our south door we are showcasing resources for courses in the School of Business, Logistics & Supply Chain. Did you know we have a dedicated Business Plan Pro workstation in the Library? Plus dozens of recent eBooks and hundreds of specialized articles.

While preparing this display I was temporarily captivated by logistics because there are so many recent innovations in this field. We’ve all heard of GPS but have you used an IPS – indoor positioning system? They are used in malls and other large spaces with many rooms. Each room or area has a transmitter using Bluetooth, WiFi or other medium; and with an app you can be directed to that specific place within the building. Wouldn’t an IPS have made those first days of classes much easier?

I recently read an article by the CMO of What3Words, a company that is providing addresses for the entire world. (Giles Rhys Jones, “Human Friendly Coordinates.” Geoinformatics, vol. 18, no. 5, 2016, pp. 10-12.) What3Words mapped the entire earth into 3-meter squares and assigned each a three-word address. Humans tend to mix up numbers – especially the long ones used by GPS systems – but research shows we can recall three random words. (They are indeed random with no connection to the purpose or neighborhood of the space so tagged.) The words are translated into local languages worldwide. This system has revolutionized humanitarian aid delivery and is allowing civil, legal, and financial services to reach communities that have been underserved. The What3Words app is free for iOS or Android, and the system now has many partners.

See you at dusty.puzzle.ritual!

Blind Date with a Book

This February, spice up your reading life by coming into the Library and taking home one of our available books. There are no awkward questions, no forced conversation, no judgmental looks, no need to call. Just choose one of your possible matches, blind date style, and take it to the circulation desk. If you fall in love with the story, great! If there is no chemistry, just return the book and there are no hard feelings or need to explain why things didn’t work out.

On Civility

The Ivy Tech Northeast Library is collaborating with the Change Action Northeast team as a part of their Setting Our Inner Compass project.

This semester will see CAN focusing on the topic of civility, and the library has procured a collection of books to support this discussion.

The books will be on display in front of the windows to the Presentation Room in the Library. Everyone in the Ivy Tech community is encouraged to participate in this discussion by checking out one or more of these books and reading them.

The CAN team is in the process of scheduling a brown bag lunch discussion date for all to share their thoughts and ideas about civility. The Library is very excited to share in the collaboration of this project and its timely topic! More information will be coming soon.

 

Title Author
Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct Forni, P. M.
Civility Carter, Stephen L.
Creating & Sustaining Civility in Nursing Education Cynthia M.
George Washington’s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior: …And Other Important Writings Washington, George
Hello!: And Every Little Thing That Matters Edwards, Kate
Saving Civility: 52 Ways to Tame Rude, Crude & Attitude for a Polite Planet Hacala, Sara
The Civility Solution: What to Do When People Are Rude Forni, P. M.
The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life Anderson, Elijah

Interactive Library Display

Celebrate National Poetry Month by creating your own verses on the Interactive Library Display by the Library’s South entrance. Library staff created a pool of random “magnet words” urging passersby to create their own poetical masterpieces. It started with one sentence and inspired others to continue. Watch a video to see what it shaped into…