Tag Archives: Early Education

September 2019 Children’s Nonfiction

Pollen: Darwin’s 130 Year Prediction

By Darcy Pattison
Call Number: Q180.55.D57 P38 2019
View in IvyCat

How long does it take for science to find an answer to a problem? On January 25, 1862, naturalist Charles Darwin received a box of orchids. One flower, the Madagascar star orchid, fascinated him. It had an 11.5” nectary, the place where flowers make nectar, the sweet liquid that insects and birds eat. How, he wondered, did insects pollinate the orchid?

The Astronaut who Painted the Moon

By Dean Robbins
Call Number: TL789.85.B36 R63 2019
View in IvyCat

As a boy, Alan wanted to fly planes. As a young navy pilot, Alan wished he could paint the view from the cockpit. So he took an art class to learn patterns and forms. But no class could prepare him for the beauty of the lunar surface some 240,000 miles from Earth. In 1969, Alan became the fourth man and first artist on the moon. He took dozens of pictures, but none compared to what he saw through his artistic eyes. When he returned to Earth, he began to paint what he saw. Alan’s paintings allowed humanity to experience what it truly felt like to walk on the moon.

When Sue Found Sue

By Toni Buzzeo
Call Number: QE707.H46 B89 2019
View in IvyCat

From a very young age, Sue Hendrickson was meant to find things: lost coins, perfume bottles, even hidden treasure. Her endless curiosity eventually led to her career in diving and paleontology, where she would continue to find things big and small. In 1990, at a dig in South Dakota, Sue made her biggest discovery to date: Sue the T. rex, the largest and most complete T. rex skeleton ever unearthed. Named in Sue’s honor, Sue the T. rex would be placed on permanent exhibition at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. 

Communication and Phonics

Early Communication Skills

51fprnikxwl-_sx351_bo1204203200_By Charlotte Lynch and Julia Kidd
Call Number: LB1140.5.L3 L96 2016
View in IvyCat

Early Communication Skills has been a popular and widely used publication since becoming available in 1991. Now in its third edition, the resource retains its original approach to communication, providing a source of fresh educational and therapeutic ideas for pre-school children. This accessible resource contains ideas for a six-session programe that could be delivered in support and training, and is ideal for educators and parents as well as Speech and Language Therapists working with Early Years.

Phonological Awareness: From Research to Practice

largeBy Gail T. Gillon
Call Number: LB1573.3 .G48 2018
View in IvyCat

Translating cutting-edge research into practical recommendations for assessment and instruction, this book has helped thousands of readers understand the key role of phonological awareness in the development of reading, writing, and spelling. It clearly shows how children’s knowledge about the sound structure of spoken language contributes to literacy acquisition. Evidence-based strategies are described for enhancing all learners’ phonological awareness and effectively supporting those who are struggling (ages 3-17). The book discusses ways to tailor instruction and intervention for a broad range of students, including English language learners (ELLs) and those with reading or language disorders. Subject Areas/Key Words: phonological awareness, phonological skills, phonemic awareness, phonemes, phonology, phonics, spoken language impairments, oral language, written language, reading development, early literacy development, oracy, speaking, teaching, assessments, interventions, instructional approaches, speech-language pathologists, speech-language pathology, special education, struggling learners, speech problems, speech disorders, learning disabilities, learning disorders, specific language impairments, dyslexia, reading disorders, spelling development, English language learners, at-risk students, speech-language therapists, early childhood education, preschoolers; English as a second language; second-language acquisition; learning multiple languages; metalinguistics; sounds.

Go Fly a Kite!

four kites flying in blue sky with clouds

April is National Kite Month and is a great time of the year to fly them. The American Kitefliers Association has many resources from directories of clubs to instruction videos. Kites are not just toys – kite making and flying can get very scientific and is a fun way to explore math, applied physics, earth science, art, and different cultures.
Kites have been used in scientific experiments like Ben Franklin’s test for electricity in lightning. Kites were used in warfare for observation as late as the second world war; in ancient times they could be flown over fortifications to test how thick walls were, by using triangulation. The classic kite shape of two triangles that share a base has many interesting mathematical properties, and can be convex or nonconvex.
Kites to be flown are not always kite-shaped, however; there are tubular sock and drogue shapes. Constructing a kite also involves tying special knots in the strings, and flying one uses the same technologies and techniques as operating a sail boat. Kites are being tested as a source of energy, as used in kite surfing, snowkiting, and kite sledding. Fighting with kites is an ancient sport taken quite seriously in parts of Asia, described in the acclaimed novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (adapted as a movie).
Many kites are made to be beautiful above all. Ancient kites were made of silk, paper, and bamboo. Today, people make them out of Tyvek® and nylon fabric too.
In some places kites are part of religious ceremonies: in India, they are flown on the Hindu festival of Makar Sankranti; in Mexico, fire kites called “little witches” are set off at night around Hallowe’en; in Guatemala, kites are flown above graves to free ancestor spirits on the Day of the Dead; in Japan, kites are released to exorcise evil spirits.
To find more information on the many aspects of kites, search in our databases using – ironically – the subject heading Kites (toys) to filter out resources concerned with the bird species called kite. (Sources: Freeman, C. (2010). Hands on geometry. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. Rowlands, J. (1989). One-hour kites. New York: St. Martin’s Press. Silvester, H.(2008).  Into the wind: the art of the kite. New York: Abrams.)

A Universal Game for Toddlers – streaming videos

As this episode begins, Scarlett (22 months) uses eye contact to engage Jack (18 months). As they make eye contact, Scarlett runs away, only to turn back and engage Jack. This creates a back and forth game of catch and release. After a moment of eye contact, smiles, and laughter the game starts again. These spontaneous games likely come from a source that is universal and bespeaks of young children’s ability to coordinate rules between themselves, without much structuring by adults.

See more new videos from Videatives:

At the beginning of the school year, a small group of pre-kindergarten children work alongside each other on a large magnetic wall.  Note that while working on a vertical surface, the child’s
The teacher in this video deliberately holds the children to one question, how can we make the up side of the plank (on a fulcrum) go down without pushing on the up side?  While the use of passive weight to make a plank move
Eli, 23 months old, and Matthew, 20 months old, have discovered a small rectangular timer.
We have added new video titles under the “Practice Videos” tab in the Video Streaming Service.

Sleep like a tiger / written by Mary Logue ; illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski

Call number: PZ7.L8288 Sl 2012

In this magical bedtime story, the lyrical narrative echoes a Runaway Bunny – like cadence: “Does everything in the world go to sleep?” the little girl asks. In sincere and imaginative dialogue between a not-at-all sleepy child and understanding parents, the little girl decides “in a cocoon of sheets, a nest of blankets,” she is ready to sleep, warm and strong, just like a tiger. The Caldecott Honor artist Pamela Zagarenski’s rich, luminous mixed-media paintings effervesce with odd, charming details that nonsleepy children could examine for hours. A rare gem. (From Google Books)

Great afterschool programs and spaces that wow!Linda J. Armstrong, Christine A. Schmidt

Call number: HQ778.6 .A76 2013


Create a high quality school-age program that is exciting, inviting, and reflects the interests, abilities, and needs of the children. Whether your program operates before or after school, on non-school days, during the summer, or overnight, you can create a dynamic environment where everyone will enjoy spending time.
This book is filled with hundreds of ideas–from setting up a quiet reading nook to tackling clutter–reflecting the authors’ years of experience and hundreds of visits to a variety of school-age programs. It takes you through all of the considerations that affect your program and then lays out a process to help you improve the three dimensions of a school-age environment.
Temporal: Establish schedules, routines, rules, and learning opportunities to meet children’s needs
Interpersonal: Facilitate the relationships and social interactions of children, staff, families, and the greater community
Physical: Create sensory-rich indoor and outdoor spaces
Does your afterschool program have the WOW factor?
Linda J. Armstrong and Christine A. Schmidt are experienced educational consultants who serve children and youth programs throughout the United States. (From Google Books)
 

Read with me : best books for preschoolers / Stephanie Zvirin

Call Number: Z1037 .Z88 2012

There is a whirl of new books and learning products on the market every day. But what are the most enjoyable, the classic favorites, or the new, hot books that your young child will enjoy and cherish? The best source for solid picks is from those in the know: librarians who work with children and parents. This guide was developed with parents, grandparents, teachers, and day care providers in mind, to help them make wise and thoughtful purchases of books and learning materials that are enjoyable, educational, and age-appropriate.

 You will learn:

  • Where to start
  • Picture books for early learners
  • The classics
  • Reading along
  • A trip to the library can help

(From Google Books)