Tag Archives: Fiction

Softly and Tenderly / Sara Evans

Call number: FIC EVA

COMING SOON…
Maybe in the wide-open country she can learn to breathe again… Happily married and owner of two successful boutiques, Jade longs to begin a family with her husband, Max. But when she discovers that Max has an illegitimate son — who he wants her to help raise — Jade’s life is turned upside down. She flees to her childhood home, a rambling Iowa farmhouse, with enough room to breathe. There — while her mother’s health grows fragile, and the tug of her first love grows stronger — Jade begins to question everything she thought she knew about family, love, and motherhood. In the wide-open landscape, Jade begins to see a future that doesn’t rest on the power of her past, but in the goodness of God’s tender mercies.(From B&N)

The Sentry (Joe Pike Series #3) / Robert Crais

Call number: FIC CRA

Dru Rayne and her uncle fled to L.A. after Hurricane Katrina; but now, five years later, they face a different danger. When Joe Pike witnesses Dru’s uncle beaten by a protection gang, he offers his help, but neither of them want it-and neither do the federal agents mysteriously watching them.
As the level of violence escalates, and Pike himself becomes a target, he and Elvis Cole learn that Dru and her uncle are not who they seem- and that everything he thought he knew about them has been a lie. A vengeful and murderous force from their past is now catching up to them and only Pike and Cole stand in the way. (From B&T

Outwitting Trolls / William G. Tapply

Call number: FIC TAP

Brady Coyne is a Boston attorney who focuses on a few private clients and the legal drudgery of their everyday life, which leads to a generally unexciting life. Brady, however, gets a call from an old friend and former neighbor—a man from his past as a happily married man. When Brady was married and living in suburbia, Ken Nichols was his happily married neighbor. Both marriages fell apart years ago and Brady moved to Boston while Ken Nichols moved to Baltimore. Now a decade later and in Boston for a conference, Ken contacts Brady for a get-together and a drink. It’s an uneventful evening but the next day Brady gets a call from Nichols’ ex-wife. She’s standing in her ex’s hotel room, Nichols is lying dead on the floor of his room and she needs Brady’s help.
But this savage murder is only the first and Brady is soon trying to find the connection between these long ago friends and the savage murders dogging their family. (From B&N)

Skating Around the Law / Joelle Charbonneau

Call number: FIC CHA

Roller skates and crime don’t mix, or do they? In Charbonneau’s fresh, funny debut they most certainly do. When Chicago mortgage broker Rebecca Robbins returns to her hometown of Indian Falls, Ill., to sell the roller rink she’s inherited, she’s dismayed to learn that handyman Mack Murphy has turned up dead, his head in one of the rink’s toilets. A bottle of prescription pills on the floor near Mack’s body suggests suicide, but medical examiner Doc Truman suspects murder, and the race is on to catch the killer.
The colorful cast of eccentrics includes Rebecca’s frisky grandfather, Pop, and Lionel Franklin, a sexy veterinarian who owns an especially entertaining camel named Elwood, a retired circus performer. Though she yearns to go back to Chicago, Rebecca ultimately realizes she might have to stay longer in Indian Falls, just in case a skating sleuth is needed. Author tour. (By Publishers Weekly from B&N)

Full Dark, No Stars / Stephen King

Call number: FIC KIN
“I believe there is another man inside every man, a stranger . . .” writes Wilfred Leland James in the early pages of the riveting confession that makes up “1922,” the first in this pitch-black quartet of mesmerizing tales from Stephen King. For James, that stranger is awakened when his wife, Arlette, proposes selling off the family homestead and moving to Omaha, setting in motion a gruesome train of murder and madness.

In “Big Driver,” a cozy-mystery writer named Tess encounters the stranger along a back road in Massachusetts when she takes a shortcut home after a book-club engagement. Violated and left for dead, Tess plots a revenge that will bring her face-to-face with another stranger: the one inside herself.
“Fair Extension,” the shortest of these tales, is perhaps the nastiest and certainly the funniest. Making a deal with the devil not only saves Dave Streeter from a fatal cancer but provides rich recompense for a lifetime of resentment.
When her husband of more than twenty years is away on one of his business trips, Darcy Anderson looks for batteries in the garage. Her toe knocks up against a box under a worktable and she discovers the stranger inside her husband. It’s a horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, and it definitively ends a good marriage.
Like Different Seasons and Four Past Midnight, which generated such enduring films as The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me, Full Dark, No Stars proves Stephen King a master of the long story form. (From From B&T)