Tag Archives: History

Frederick Douglass Newspapers and other Abolitionist sources

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Frederick Douglass was a great orator, eloquent writer, and the publisher of three newspapers supporting the cause of Abolition. After escaping enslavement, his own freedom was bought with funds raised from his speaking tour of Europe. Douglass championed African-American owned newspapers as essential, declaring that:  “the man who has suffered the wrong is the man to demand redress,—that the man STRUCK is the man to CRY OUT—and that he who has endured the cruel pangs of Slavery is the man to advocate Liberty.”

The Library of Congress has now digitized their entire Frederick Douglass Newspaper Collection and made it freely available and searchable online. This is a subset of the Frederick Douglass Papers collection which they also curate. Although the Library holds the largest collection of his newspapers, it does not include every issue, because the Douglasses’ house was burned (by suspected arson) destroying part of his library where archival copies were stored.

Douglass was involved in publishing newspapers from the 1840s into the 1870s. These are powerful primary sources for learning about the experiences of African Americans in the United States from the antebellum era through Reconstruction. The Library of Congress provides freely downloadable teaching kits for the Frederick Douglass Papers, and for other primary sources from this time.

Other digital collections of Frederick Douglass papers are at Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis; and in the New York Heritage Digital Collections.

In the Frederick Douglass collections one can find connections to Fort Wayne and the African-American and Abolitionist communities here. Henry Ward Beecher was a correspondent of Douglass; his father Lyman Beecher headed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati during the period it was splintered by abolitionism. Henry Beecher visited Fort Wayne in 1843 and convinced members of the First Presbyterian Church – until then served by the abolitionist pastor Alexander T. Rankin – to split off and form another abolitionist congregation, which his brother Charles served as pastor for its first six years. Indiana was not a slaveholding state, but the position of African Americans was precarious within its borders. Rankin’s house in downtown Fort Wayne has been identified as a stop on the underground railroad.

Among our books dealing with abolitionist activism in Fort Wayne are:

The Underground Railroad and the Antislavery Movement in Fort Wayne and Allen County, Indiana by Angela M. Quinn – View Record in IvyCat

Slavery and the Meetinghouse: The Quakers and the Abolitionist Dilemma, 1820-1865 by Ryan P. Jordan – View Record in IvyCat

Indiana, 1816-1850: The Pioneer Era by Donald F. Carmony – View Record in IvyCat

Homeless, Friendless, and Penniless: The WPA Interviews with Former Slaves Living in Indiana compiled by Ronald L. Baker – View Record in IvyCat

A trove of primary sources relating to the Underground Railroad in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio is The Wilbur H. Siebert collection, available online from the Ohio Memory Network. Professor Siebert, of Ohio State University, began the project with his history students in the 1890s. They were able to interview former fugitives, “railroad agents,” and others for whom escapes were living memory. The Siebert collection includes this map of escape routes through Indiana on which Fort Wayne is a node.

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Image courtesy of the Ohio History Connection

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

This November, please join us in celebrating Native American heritage!

Help us tell all Americans’ stories. Of the many Native Americans spotlighted at Ivy Tech Library, the three below are often regarded as exceptional. Stop by this month to collect one of their bookmarks!

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
U.S. Senator

Born in 1933 of a Portuguese immigrant mother and Northern Cheyenne father, Campbell is one of 44 chiefs of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. He earned a degree in physical education and fine arts after serving in the U.S. Air force from 1951-1953. He served in the Colorado State Legislature before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1987. He won his bid to become a senator in 1992 and won re-election in 1998.

Henry, C. Ben Nighthorse Campbell: Cheyenne Chief and U.S. Senator. Broomall, PA: Chelsea House, 1994.

Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina

From 1947 to 1960, Maria Tallchief performed with the New York City Ballet, gaining prima ballerina status. Later she danced with the American Ballet Theatre, returning to the New York City Ballet in 1963 until her retirement in 1965. But she didn’t retire from dance. She directed the Lyric Opera Ballet of Chicago and founded the Chicago City Ballet in 1981. She was the latter’s artistic director through 1987.

Tallchief, Maria and Kaplan, L. Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Winona LaDuke
Activist, Author

A member of the Anishinaabeg (Ojibew) tribe, Winona LaDuke’s activism dates back to her teens. At age 18 she spoke before the United Nations about Indian issues. While at Harvard earning an economics degree, she worked with grassroots Native American organizations in various states. After graduation, she moved to the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, where she lives today with her family.

LaDuke, Winona. All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 1999. Ms. Magazine, April/May 2001, pp. 46-53.

Find the following eBooks on Ivy Tech Library’s catalog website, IvyCat!

I am where I come from: Native American college students and graduates tell their life stories

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture

Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

Follow the official celebration here:

Spirits of Fort Wayne

How will you be remembered?  This October, the Ivy Tech Library calls upon the departed influential Fort Wayne residents to tell their stories. 

Meet Alice Hamilton, a medical doctor from the early 20th century, whose advocacy for workers’ rights proved crucial in industrial poison legislation. Consider Frances Slocum, known as an 18th century Delaware captive, who later in life leveraged her story to prevent the removal of her adopted community from Indiana. You are likely already familiar with Philo Farnsworth and Carole Lombard, but what about Henry Cannady, who selflessly helped former slaves escape through the Underground Railroad?

Many irreplaceable community members are those whose stories demand reevaluation of norms taken for granted, lives buried by nefarious or apathetic forces.  Whose voice would you resurrect?  Who would you give peace?  Who would you condemn?  Find them all at Ivy Tech Library.

Constitution day September 17th

Celebrate Constitution Day by spending some time with the document that grants US citizens their rights and privileges. An annotated online version is available from Congress.gov that aims to increase understanding of the Constitution and how it affects our society.

Constitution Annotated allows users to browse through all the Articles and Amendments, providing links to Supreme Court decisions based on each. Users can also perform topic searches and find all the passages in the Articles and Amendments and the Supreme Court cases dealing with that topic. For example, I searched “religion” in the topic search bar at the top of the page, and a list is generated of all passages in the Constitution and in Supreme Court decisions that include the term.

Notice that all the State and federal laws held unconstitutional by the Supreme Court have been tabulated for easy cross-reference.

On the same site are links to digitized primary source documents from the Constitutional Convention. View George Washington’s copy of the constitution draft annotated in his own handwriting! Read a broadside “Ode” celebrating the Constitution. Peruse pamphlets published in state and national newspapers arguing for and against the national Constitution and its ratification process. There is a very helpful “Historical Note” on the formation of the constitution, that places all of these documents in context.

With all these resources, we can surely go forth and “form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”

New Books on International Security

9780190854829

Intelligence: The Secret World of Spies, an Anthology, Fifth edition

Edited by Loch K. Johnson and James J. Wirtz

Call number: JK 468 .I6 I467 2019

View record in IvyCat

This book will be of interest for history, political science, and security studies. “A diverse, comprehensive, and highly accessible set of thirty-three readings by leading experts in the field. […] features coverage of many topics including methods of intelligence collection, intelligence analysis, the danger of intelligence politicization, relationships between intelligence officers and the policymakers they serve, covert action, counterintelligence, accountability and civil liberties, and the global struggle against ISIS. New articles focus on a range of important historical and current topics in intelligence, including the President’s Daily Brief, Social Media intelligence (“SOCMINT”), drone warfare, and the implications of Edward Snowden’s controversial intelligence leaks.” — Publisher

9780199390038

The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia

By Andrei Lankov

Call number: DS 935.774 .L36 2015

View record in IvyCat

Useful for historical research as well as political science and security studies, this paperback edition of the acclaimed 2013 book is fully updated and revised. It is a history of North Korea, but the topical organization and extensive index make it easy for readers to drill right down to specific information. The author draws on sources ranging from international intelligence to personal interviews. “A native of the former Soviet Union … [Lankov] lived as an exchange student in North Korea in the 1980s. He has studied it for his entire career, using his fluency in Korean and personal contacts to build a rich, nuanced understanding. […] Lankov substitutes cold, clear analysis for the overheated rhetoric surrounding this opaque police state. After providing an accessible history of the nation, he turns his focus to what North Korea is, what its leadership thinks, and how its people cope with living in such an oppressive and poor place. He argues that North Korea is not irrational, and nothing shows this better than its continuing survival against all odds.” — Publisher

Public Domain Day 2019

On January 1st 2019, works copyrighted in 1923 entered the public domain! This is the first “Public Domain Day” since Congress extended copyright in 1998. Books, films, and sheet music copyrighted that year in the United States are now free to use without seeking permission or paying fees. (Only the 1923 editions, if there are later copyrighted editions! Librarians call this the 1923 manifestation of a work.)

Duke University’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain has a detailed explanation and a list of some notable items that have “gone public.” They may be worth considering for course or research project materials. HathiTrust already has released over 20,000 books and scientific reports copyrighted in 1923.

Some works from 1923 are startlingly out of touch with current values. The full lyrics of “Yes! We Have No Bananas” – a song refrain my family has sung for years – reveal it is an ethnic caricature. Songs making fun of ethnic groups were popular in the 1920s. The Library of Congress has more examples, plus curricula for teaching about them and about attitudes towards immigrants. As upsetting as such materials may be, having them publicly available is important to understanding our current social climate.

A librarian can help you locate public domain materials, and answer your copyright questions. Here’s to many happy returns of Public Domain Day!

November’s Commemorations

The month of November seems especially rich in historical commemorations, starting on November 1st when Christians celebrate All Saints Day. Guy Fawkes Day on November 5th recalls England’s struggle for religious freedom, and November 19th is the anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address during the American Civil War. During this month we honor our Native American heritage, especially on Thanksgiving; hold elections; and honor our veterans. The Library of Congress has many resources for students of all ages to explore these topics.

A newly digitized collection of 14 historical newspapers published in Native communities is gathered in the database Chronicling America. These range from coast to coast and cover nearly a century: 1828 to 1922. Many include transcriptions in Native languages along with English language articles that reveal the points of view and concerns of their communities. Try reading the Cherokee writing that Sequoya invented!

Veterans’ Day was originally Armistice Day, celebrating the end of the Great War, which later became known as World War I. November 11th, 2018 will mark 100 years since the cessation of hostilities.  Several divisions of the Library of Congress have contributed short introductions highlighting items from their collections relevant to this occasion.

One of the most moving eulogies to veterans is President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. View an autograph manuscript copy from the Library of Congress collections.

We have books on all these topics available for checkout. This month we are displaying children’s books on Native American heritage and Thanksgiving. As you enter the library, look over our showcase of Agriculture resources in the hallway. We hope to see you soon!

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What are digital humanities? Find out at THATCamp!

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The Humanities And Technology = THATCamp

We are participating in THATCamp Midwest @ Purdue University Fort Wayne. It will take place Friday October 5th from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., followed by optional discussion time. THATCamp Midwest @ Purdue Fort Wayne will function a bit differently than the usual THATCamp as there will be more focus on learning about digital humanities, which means we will have more structure and pre-scheduled sessions. It is perfect for faculty, staff, and students wishing to move into this field.

The day will include brief presentations, panel discussions, and workshops covering topics including: metadata tagging, social networking and data visualization, digital collections, digital project management, animation, augmented reality, and incorporating digital projects in classes/programs. A preliminary schedule is posted here on the website, where you can also register to attend. We hope to see you there!

Secret Lives: What Your Teachers Never Told You

Read this series to discover the secrets behind some of the world’s best-known people, including authors, artists, politicians, and more!

 

Titles included: