Tag Archives: Juvenile

The day we walked on the moon : a photo history of space exploration / by George Sullivan

Call number: TL793 .S925 1990

A fascinating look at outer space exploration filled with dramatic color photographs and bold newspaper headlines. From the first flights into space to the momentous day Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, from Skylab to the Shuttle, plus an exciting look at what lies ahead, this book will intrigue readers of all ages. (From Amazon)

The skull in the rock : how a scientist, a boy, and Google Earth opened a new window on human origins / by Lee Berger and Marc Aronson

Call number: GN282 .A695 2012


In 2008, Professor Lee Berger–with the help of his curious 9-year-old son–discovered two remarkably well preserved, two-million-year-old fossils of an adult female and young male, known as Australopithecus sediba; a previously unknown species of ape-like creatures that may have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. This discovery of has been hailed as one of the most important archaeological discoveries in history. The fossils reveal what may be one of humankind’s oldest ancestors.Berger believes the skeletons they found on the Malapa site in South Africa could be the “Rosetta stone that unlocks our understanding of the genus Homo” and may just redesign the human family tree.

Berger, an Eagle Scout and National Geographic Grantee, is the Reader in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science in the Institute for Human Evolution at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

The focus of the book will be on the way in which we can apply new thinking to familiar material and come up with a breakthrough. Marc Aronson is particularly interested in framing these issues for young people and has had enormous success with this approach in his previous books: Ain’t Nothing But a Man and If Stones Could Speak.

Berger’s discovery in one of the most excavated and studied areas on Earth revealed a treasure trove of human fossils–and an entirely new human species–where people thought no more field work might ever be necessary. Technology and revelation combined, plus a good does of luck, to broaden by ten times the number of early human fossils known, rejuvenating this field of study and posing countless more questions to be answered in years and decades to come. (From Google Books)