Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

New Books: Race Relations

“A valuable guide . . . While especially helpful for those new to the critical analysis of whiteness, this work also offers a useful refresher to anyone committed to the ongoing process of self-assessment and anti-oppression work.” (Library Journal)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin Diangelo: HT1521 .D486 2018

The history and contributions of African Americans in northeast Indiana have been largely overlooked. This new publication, African Americans in Fort Wayne: The First 200 Years, does not claim to be a definitive history of the topic. It does, however, recognize and honor the pioneers who have made the African-American community in Fort Wayne what it is today.

African Americans in Fort Wayne : The First 200 Years by Dodie Marie Miller: F534.F7 M647 2000

New Books: College Teaching and Learning

“Every college professor should read this book. It is useful, accessible, lively, and humorous. It is not ideological or pedantic, but is instead a practical guide to becoming a better professor for those of us who never desired to read a book about pedagogy.” (David Arnold, Columbia Basin College)

Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers by Jessamyn Neuhaus: LB2331 .N424 2019

“Gooblar adds his voice to a growing chorus questioning the absence of systematic pedagogical training of the professoriate in higher education. With deep empathy for emerging educators and an unwavering focus on students, Gooblar offers a guide towards cultivating a collaborative, active, and inclusive classroom.” (Kimberly Tanner, San Francisco State University)

The Missing Course: Everything They Never Taught You about College Teaching by David Gooblar: LB1778 .G655 2019

Cheating in College is a valuable read that allows educators of all disciplines to gain much-needed insight into the numerous complex issues related to student cheating. It also offers readers concrete and easy to follow tips on how to work to reduce the prevalence of cheating in their classrooms and campuses.” (Academy of Management Learning & Education)

Cheating in College: Why Students Do It and What Educators Can Do about it by Donald L. McCabe, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Linda K. Trevino: LB3609 .M27 2017

“This powerful book beautifully merges data and anecdote to explain that for far too many, college is not a gateway, but a trap. We as a society can and must do better, and The College Dropout Scandal shows us how.” (Wes Moore, bestselling author)

The College Dropout Scandal by David Kirp: LC148.15 .K57 2019

“For anyone teaching online—novice or seasoned—Small Teaching Online is a must-read! Darby expertly combines educational research and her expertise as an instructional designer to suggest practical solutions to challenges faced in the online environment in bite-sized chunks that don’t overwhelm.” (Mel Young, Teaching and Learning Innovation Hub, Cambrian College)

Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Sciences in Online Classes by Flower Darby: LB1028.5 .D322 2019

New Books on Education

“With its inviting tone and straightforward advice, 33 Simple Steps for Faculty is the rare combination of useful and user-friendly. For faculty who feel like their time is stretched more than ever, Nunn provides excellent strategies with which professors can help students succeed.” (Jessica Wilkerson, Center for the Study of Southern Culture, University of Mississippi)

33 Simple Strategies for Faculty by Lisa M. Nunn: LB2343.32 .N86 2019

“As an expert in the cognitive science of learning and an award-winning educator, Miller is well-poised to bridge the gap between science and practice. Minds Online translates principles and findings from cognitive science into concrete, actionable tips and recommendations for educators trying to incorporate technology into their teaching. This is a terrific book.” (Sean Kang, Dartmouth College)

Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology by Michelle D. Miller: LB1028.5 .M548 2016

“An essential, compelling and practical examination of the relationship between culture and cognition that will forever transform how we think about our role facilitating the learning of other people’s children – and our own children!” (LaShawn Route Chatmon, Executive Director, National Equity Project)

Culturally Responsive Teaching & the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students by Zaretta Hammond: LC1099.3 .H335 2015

“Overall, Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence is an essential resource for the field of faculty development and for the higher education sector. Beach and colleagues provide an updated examination of the status of the field, and create meaningful arguments in favor of continually strengthening faculty development. Beyond that, the book asks important questions for practitioners to reflect and act upon, in order to continue evolving the field of faculty development and the overall impact of higher education in society.” (Teachers College Record)

Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence: Current Practices, Future Imperatives by Andrea L. Beach, Mary Deane Sorcinelli, Ann E. Austin, and Jaclyn K. Rivard: LB2331.7.B43 2016

“This brilliant book that presents a comprehensive look at the concerns about student loan debt, the employment rate of college graduates, and the viability of institutions of higher learning. Tiffany Mfume does an amazing job of offering a thoroughly researched perspective on this landscape and answers the question most inquisitive minds want to know: ‘Is a college degree really worth it?'” (Heidi M. Anderson, president, University of Maryland Eastern Shore)

The College Completion Glass–Half-full or Half-Empty? Exploring the Value of Postsecondary Education by Tiffany Beth Mfume: LC148.2 .M48 2019

“This book makes a compelling case for adopting universal design in all postsecondary offerings in order to support a diverse educational community and an inclusive approach to academic excellence. There is something here for everyone.”
(Michael K. Young, president, Texas A&M University)

Universal Design in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice 2nd Edition by Sheryl E. Burgstahler: LC4818.38 .U55 2015

New Early Childhood Education Books

Engaging Learners Through Artmaking: Choice-Based Art Education in the Classroom (TAB)

By Katherine M. Douglas and Diane B. Jaquith
Call Number: N 350 .D6 2018
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The authors who introduced the concepts of “Teaching for Artistic Behavior” (TAB) and “choice-based art education” have completely revised and updated their original, groundbreaking bestseller that was designed to facilitate independent learning and support student choices in subject matter and media.

More than ever before, teachers are held accountable for student growth and this new edition offers updated recommendations for assessments at multiple levels, the latest strategies and structures for effective instruction, and new resources and helpful tips that provide multiple perspectives and entry points for readers.

The Second Edition of Engaging Learners Through Artmaking will support those who are new to choice-based authentic art education, as well as experienced teachers looking to go deeper with this curriculum. This dynamic, user-friendly resource includes sample lesson plans and demonstrations, assessment criteria, curricular mapping, room planning, photos of classroom set-ups, media exploration, and many other concrete and open-ended strategies for implementing TAB in kindergarten–grade 8.

Overview by Barnes and Noble

Teaching Early Years: Theory and Practice / Edition 1

By Amanda Thomas and Karen Mcinnes
Call Number: LB 1139.23 .T43 2018
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This textbook focuses on the main areas of teaching young children, covering the 3-7 years age range that spans the early years and primary phases. The majority of chapters are written by both an academic and practitioner, reflecting a genuine theory and practice approach, and this helps the reader to set theoretical discussion in the context of real practice.

Key themes explored within the book include:

–        Play and playfulness in the curriculum

–        Child development in practice

–        Literacy development and subject pedagogy

–        Creativity and outdoor learning

Packed full of learning features such as case studies, reflective questions and lesson plans, Teaching Early Years is an essential resource for both students and practitioners, and will enhance your knowledge of how young children think and learn.

Overview by Amazon

Preschool Appropriate Practices: Environment, Curriculum, and Development / Edition 5

By Janice J. Beaty
Call Number: LB 1140.4 .B43 2019
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Preschool Appropriate Practices, 5th Edition, helps future and current teachers create self-directed learning environments in their classrooms. Each chapter helps students learn how to set up one type of learning center (e.g., music/dance), including instructions on what to include in the center and how children can use it. The self-directed learning approach encourages children to become involved in their own learning. A second theme emphasizes the teacher’s role as a facilitator, helping readers understand how to:

1) observe children’s developmental levels,

2) provide developmentally appropriate activities,

3) serve as a behavior model, and

4) best support children in their learning.

Learning activities, some of which incorporate children’s picture books, exemplify the NAEYC’s developmentally appropriate practice (DAP). Chapters also incorporate NAEYC accreditation criteria.

Overview by Amazon

September 2019 Children’s Nonfiction

Pollen: Darwin’s 130 Year Prediction

By Darcy Pattison
Call Number: Q180.55.D57 P38 2019
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How long does it take for science to find an answer to a problem? On January 25, 1862, naturalist Charles Darwin received a box of orchids. One flower, the Madagascar star orchid, fascinated him. It had an 11.5” nectary, the place where flowers make nectar, the sweet liquid that insects and birds eat. How, he wondered, did insects pollinate the orchid?

The Astronaut who Painted the Moon

By Dean Robbins
Call Number: TL789.85.B36 R63 2019
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As a boy, Alan wanted to fly planes. As a young navy pilot, Alan wished he could paint the view from the cockpit. So he took an art class to learn patterns and forms. But no class could prepare him for the beauty of the lunar surface some 240,000 miles from Earth. In 1969, Alan became the fourth man and first artist on the moon. He took dozens of pictures, but none compared to what he saw through his artistic eyes. When he returned to Earth, he began to paint what he saw. Alan’s paintings allowed humanity to experience what it truly felt like to walk on the moon.

When Sue Found Sue

By Toni Buzzeo
Call Number: QE707.H46 B89 2019
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From a very young age, Sue Hendrickson was meant to find things: lost coins, perfume bottles, even hidden treasure. Her endless curiosity eventually led to her career in diving and paleontology, where she would continue to find things big and small. In 1990, at a dig in South Dakota, Sue made her biggest discovery to date: Sue the T. rex, the largest and most complete T. rex skeleton ever unearthed. Named in Sue’s honor, Sue the T. rex would be placed on permanent exhibition at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. 

July 2019 Children’s Books

Non-Fiction

Seeds Move

By Robin Page
Call Number: QK929 .P34 2019
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Every seed, big or small, needs sunlight, water, and an uncrowded place to put down roots. But how do seeds get to the perfect place to grow? This exploration of seed dispersal covers a wide range of seeds and the creatures that help them move, from a coconut seed floating on waves to an African grass seed rolled by a dung beetle, to a milkweed seed floating on the wind.

Secret Engineer: How Emily Roebling Built the Brooklyn Bridge

By Rachel Dougherty
Call Number: TG25 .N53 D68 2019
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On a warm spring day in 1883, a woman rode across the Brooklyn Bridge with a rooster on her lap. It was the first trip across an engineering marvel that had taken nearly fourteen years to construct. The woman’s husband was the chief engineer, and he knew all about the dangerous new technique involved. The woman insisted she learn as well.

When he fell ill mid-construction, her knowledge came in handy. She supervised every aspect of the project while he was bedridden, and she continued to learn about things only men were supposed to know: math, science, engineering.

Women weren’t supposed to be engineers. But this woman insisted she could do it all, and her hard work helped to create one of the most iconic landmarks in the world.

Fiction

A Piglet Named Mercy

By Kate DiCamillo
Call Number: PIC DIC
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Mr. Watson and Mrs. Watson live ordinary lives. Sometimes their lives feel a bit too ordinary. Sometimes they wish something different would happen. And one day it does, when someone unpredictable finds her way to their front door. In a delightful origin story for the star of the Mercy Watson series, a tiny piglet brings love (and chaos) to Deckawoo Drive — and the Watsons’ lives will never be the same.

Sadie and the Silver Shoes

By Jane Godwin
Call Number: PIC GOD
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With three older brothers to pass along hand-me-downs, Sadie doesn’t have much say in choosing her clothes. Her outfits always look interesting, though (even if some kids at school might not think so). But Sadie is allowed to pick her shoes, so one day she buys the most beautiful shoes ever — shoes that sparkle in the sun, shoes she wears everywhere. That is, until Sadie and her brothers hop down a creek on an adventure, and one shoe falls off and is swept away. Whatever will Sadie do with one silver shoe? From a winning picture-book team comes a story of creativity, resilience, and like-minded souls that is sure to appeal to independent thinkers everywhere.

The Happiest Tree: A Story of Growing Up

By Hyeon-Ju Lee
Call Number: PIC LEE
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Over the years, the gingko tree that resides outside an apartment building has seen many things. When it was ten, sounds of the Rose piano class filled the ground floor and whistled through its young branches. At fourteen, a growth spurt year, it met Mr. Artist on the second floor whose muse was the tree itself. As the years continue on, the tree encounters many people in the apartment building making memories. Some are happy, some are sad―they’re all part of growing up. All part of who we will be in the future.

Bear Needs Help

By Sarah S. Brannen
Call Number PIC BRA
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A lumbering little polar bear has one shoe untied, and he needs some help! Sadly for him, though, the other animals are all too scared of him: the lemmings, rabbits, and seals all run away as he approaches them for assistance. What’s Bear going to do? Luckily, two plucky birds are more than happy to help out and offer advice — though probably not quite in the way that readers anticipate.

The Cook and the King

By Julia Donaldson
Call Number: PIC DON
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A hungry but finicky king wants Wobbly Bob as his new cook, but must pitch in to do everything the cook is afraid to do, from fishing to frying.