Tag Archives: Science

New Agriculture Books

A Botanist’s Vocabulary: 1300 Terms Explained and Illustrated. By Susan K. Pell and Bobbi Angell.

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This book has been added to our non-circulating Reference collection, in support of our Agriculture program. “A Botanist’s Vocabulary gives gardeners and naturalists a better understanding of what they see and a way to categorize and organize the natural world in which they are so intimately involved. Through concise definitions and detailed black and white illustrations, it defines 1300 words commonly used by botanists, naturalists, and gardeners to describe plants.” (publisher)

Native Plants of the Midwest: A Comprehensive Guide to the Best 500 Species for the Garden. By Allen Branhagen.

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Branhagen is a regional expert and director of horticulture at Powell Gardens, Kansas City, MO; the book comes encrusted with encomiums from plant scientists throughout the Midwest. “Features the best native plants in the heartland and offers clear and concise guidance on how to use them in the garden. Plant profiles for more than 500 species of trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, ground covers, bulbs, and annuals contain the common and botanical names, growing information, tips on using the plant in a landscape, and advice on related plants. You’ll learn how to select the right plant and how to design with native plants. Helpful lists of plants for specific purposes are shared throughout. This comprehensive book is for native plant enthusiasts and home gardeners” (publisher)

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes. By Dan Egan.

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This book is a model for science reporting. It won the J. Anthony Lukas Award, the Grantham Prize for Excellence in Reporting on the Environment, Special Merit Citation and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. It is relevant to both our Agriculture and Environmental safety programs. Egan draws on interviews with residents, scientists, government officials, and historical documents; the notes and bibliography cover 23 pages.

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes is prize-winning reporter Dan Egan’s compulsively readable portrait of an ecological catastrophe happening right before our eyes, blending the epic story of the lakes with an examination of the perils they face and the ways we can restore and preserve them for generations to come … In an age when dire problems like the Flint water crisis or the California drought bring ever more attention to the indispensability of safe, clean, easily available water, The Death and the Life of the Great Lakes is a powerful paean to what is arguably our most precious resource, an urgent examination of what threatens it and a convincing call to arms about the relatively simple things we need to do to protect it.” (publisher)

 

Teaching STEM

STEM Lesson Essentials, Grades 3-8: Integrating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

51UXAvjUGTL._SX393_BO1,204,203,200_By Jo Anne Vasquez, Cary Sneider and Michael Comer
Call Number: LB1585.3 .V38 2013
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Want to know how to implement authentic STEM teaching and learning into your classroom? STEM Lesson Essentials provides all the tools and strategies you’ll need to design integrated, interdisciplinary STEM lessons and units that are relevant and exciting to your students. With clear definitions of both STEM and STEM literacy, the authors argue that STEM in itself is not a curriculum, but rather a way of organizing and delivering instruction by weaving the four disciplines together in intentional ways. Rather than adding two new subjects to the curriculum, the engineering and technology practices can instead be blended into existing math and science lessons in ways that engage students and help them master 21st century skills.

Engineering in Elementary STEM Education: Curriculum Design, Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

9780807776711By Christine M. Cunningham
Call Number: LB1585.3 .C86 2018
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Bolstered by new standards and new initiatives to promote STEM education, engineering is making its way into the school curriculum. This comprehensive introduction will help elementary educators integrate engineering into their classroom, school, or district in age-appropriate, inclusive, and engaging ways. Building on the work of a Museum of Science team that has spent 15 years developing elementary engineering curricula, this book outlines how engineering can be integrated into a broader STEM curriculum, details its pedagogical benefits to students, and includes classroom examples to help educators tailor instruction to engage diverse students.

New Children’s Books for January

I Have a Balloon by Ariel Bernstein; Scott Magoon (Illustrator)

I Have a Balloon by Ariel Bernstein; Scott Magoon (Illustrator)Owl has a red balloon. Monkey does not. “That red balloon matches my shiny red tie,” says Monkey. “I’d look fancy walking to school with a shiny red balloon. The only thing I’ve ever wanted, since right now, is a shiny, big red balloon. It would make me SO HAPPY!” But Owl does not want to give it to him. So Monkey tries to find something that Owl wants: a teddy bear, a robot, a picture of TEN balloons. Owl does not want any of these things. But then, Monkey offers him…a sock! Hmmmmm…Owl is intrigued. Will he trade his shiny red balloon with Monkey? Hint: this is not a book about sharing.

Birds by Bridget Heos; David Clark (Illustrator)

Birds by Bridget Heos; David Clark (Illustrator)

What animals compose music, decorate their homes, weave, and even give gifts? BIRDS! While they may eat bugs and lay eggs, we actually have a lot in common with these winged creatures. From their parenting to their homemaking, their fishing to their dancing, birds do have lots in common with people–though with fascinating twists all their own. Factual and funny–and featuring a dynamic mix of photographs and cartoon illustrations–Just Like Us! Birds will charm even the most reluctant nonfiction readers.

Read the Book, Lemmings! by Ame Dyckman; Zacharia OHora (Illustrator)

Read the Book, Lemmings! by Ame Dyckman; Zachariah OHora (Illustrator)

The team behind the New York Times bestselling Wolfie the Bunny and Horrible Bear! is back with with new Arctic characters in this hilarious learning-to-read adventure! Aboard the S.S. Cliff, First Mate Foxy reads an interesting fact: “Lemmings don’t jump off cliffs.” But Foxy can’t get the lemmings on the Cliff to read his book, too. They’re too busy jumping off. After a chilly third rescue, exasperated Foxy and grumbly polar bear Captain PB realize their naughty nautical crew isn’t being stubborn: The lemmings (Jumper, Me Too, and Ditto) can’t read. And until Foxy patiently teaches his lemmings to read the book, he can’t return to reading it, either!

I Want That Nut! by Madeline Valentine

9781101940372

A nutty and clever buddy story that celebrates cooperation, perfect for fans of Duck and Goose. Meet Mouse and Chipmunk, two young rodents who want the same thing–a big, beautiful nut! But who deserves it more? After all, Chipmunk and the Nut read together and lie in the grass and stare at the clouds. Chipmunk wants that nut! And Mouse and the Nut play tic-tac-toe and have a dance party together. Mouse also wants that nut!   But then Squirrel comes along and claims the Nut for his own. What’s a rodent to do?

Robinson by Peter Sís

robinson

A boy who loves adventure. A mysterious solo journey. A remote island wilderness. Cast away in this beautiful dreamlike story and discover what surprises await. Peter Sís blends a true story from his childhood with the fictional adventure of Robinson Crusoe to create a magical picture book filled with heart and imagination that readers will want to return to again and again.

Welcome to Fall Semester at Ivy Tech Northeast!

Over the summer we made some changes to our library website in order to serve you better

Let us know what you think!

From our homepage, when you click on the Articles link in the left navigation panel, you will now find the databases grouped by subject.

We have maintained the A-Z List which is alphabetical by title.

Instructors: We have changed a few of our database subscriptions, so please check on the resources available for your assignments. We encourage the use of Guides to point students to appropriate resources, whether databases, websites, or whatever. A Librarian will be delighted to set one up for your courses and sections. These can be linked to your IvyLearn course site too.

Requesting library instruction for your class is quicker and easier. Use the Schedule Instruction link on the left navigation panel and fill out the form, which is so self-explanatory that faculty are already using it. (A detailed mailing on this new system is being distributed.)

Students: Reserving the study rooms is now Self-Service! Use the Reserve Rooms link on the left navigation panel of the Library Home page. You can do this remotely on any device, or come in and use the kiosk at the front desk where our friendly staff will show you how.

Everyone: Check out our new Apps for College guide, which has collected the best mobile device apps especially useful to students and teachers.

Come on in and peruse our book display this month, which relates to the solar eclipse. You can check these books out, along with #1 NY Times Bestseller, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by the always-entertaining Neil de Grasse Tyson in our Baker & Taylor collection.

It’s not necessary to memorize all the numbers he throws around to understand the principles he explains. You will feel smarter just carrying this around!

New books we have received:

Behold the Dreamers “A compulsively readable debut novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream—the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy”
New York Times Bestseller – Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award – Longlisted for the PEN/Open Book Award – An ALA Notable Book

Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult “An irresistible, nostalgic, insightful—and totally original—ramble through classic children’s literature from Vanity Fair contributing editor (and father) Bruce Handy.”

The Driver “From the creator of the TV show Bones comes a ‘riveting, smart and funny’ (Harlan Coben) debut thriller. ‘Everything a great thriller should be—always smart, often funny, and relentlessly exciting. I loved every page.’ (Scott Turow)”

Coming soon:

The Burning Girl “A bracing, hypnotic coming-of-age story about the bond of best friends, from the New York Times best-selling author of The Emperor’s Children.”

Stay with Me “This celebrated, unforgettable first novel, shortlisted for the prestigious Bailey’s Prize and set in Nigeria, gives voice to both husband and wife as they tell the story of their marriage—and the forces that threaten to tear it apart.”

You can place holds on these books if they are not available using your IvyTech library account.

Best wishes to everyone for a successful semester!

Go Fly a Kite!

four kites flying in blue sky with clouds

April is National Kite Month and is a great time of the year to fly them. The American Kitefliers Association has many resources from directories of clubs to instruction videos. Kites are not just toys – kite making and flying can get very scientific and is a fun way to explore math, applied physics, earth science, art, and different cultures.
Kites have been used in scientific experiments like Ben Franklin’s test for electricity in lightning. Kites were used in warfare for observation as late as the second world war; in ancient times they could be flown over fortifications to test how thick walls were, by using triangulation. The classic kite shape of two triangles that share a base has many interesting mathematical properties, and can be convex or nonconvex.
Kites to be flown are not always kite-shaped, however; there are tubular sock and drogue shapes. Constructing a kite also involves tying special knots in the strings, and flying one uses the same technologies and techniques as operating a sail boat. Kites are being tested as a source of energy, as used in kite surfing, snowkiting, and kite sledding. Fighting with kites is an ancient sport taken quite seriously in parts of Asia, described in the acclaimed novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (adapted as a movie).
Many kites are made to be beautiful above all. Ancient kites were made of silk, paper, and bamboo. Today, people make them out of Tyvek® and nylon fabric too.
In some places kites are part of religious ceremonies: in India, they are flown on the Hindu festival of Makar Sankranti; in Mexico, fire kites called “little witches” are set off at night around Hallowe’en; in Guatemala, kites are flown above graves to free ancestor spirits on the Day of the Dead; in Japan, kites are released to exorcise evil spirits.
To find more information on the many aspects of kites, search in our databases using – ironically – the subject heading Kites (toys) to filter out resources concerned with the bird species called kite. (Sources: Freeman, C. (2010). Hands on geometry. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. Rowlands, J. (1989). One-hour kites. New York: St. Martin’s Press. Silvester, H.(2008).  Into the wind: the art of the kite. New York: Abrams.)

New – ScienceDirect from Elsevier

Do you need articles from scholarly, peer-reviewed journals? Do you need the latest and best research from the fields of health and life sciences, physical sciences, or social and behavioral sciences?

If so, then ScienceDirect is the place to go. ScienceDirect is a new Library database that publishes academic journals produced by Elsevier, one of the most prestigious academic publishers in the world.

ScienceDirect carries the world’s best research, including articles that are not yet available in print, and going back to 1995, from almost 1,200 journals.