Tag Archives: Technology

Exam Cram: CompTIA A+ 220-901 and 220-902

With accompanying CD-ROM at the Circulation Desk.

41vo94oxzll-_sx331_bo1204203200_By David L. Prowse
Call Number: QA 76.3 .P78554 2016
View in IvyCat

This is the perfect study guide to help you pass CompTIA ‘s new A+ 220-901 and 220-902 exams. It provides coverage and practice questions for every exam topic, including substantial new coverage of Windows 8/8.1, new PC hardware, tablets, smartphones, OS X, Linux, cloud computing, and professional-level networking and security. Extensive prep tools include quizzes, Exam Alerts, our great last-minute Cram Sheet, two full practice exams in the print book and an additional two exams in the test engine, plus complete real-time practice and feedback through Pearson’s state-of-the-art test engine. You’ll also find ten exclusive Real World Scenario case studies, all linked to simulations or video on the DVD!

Practice Questions

9780789756305-usBy David L. Prowse
Call Number: QA 76.3 .P785543 2016
View in IvyCat

Covers the critical information you’ll need to know to score higher on your A+ 220-901 and 220-902 exams! Features 640 questions, organized to reflect the newest objectives for the A+ exams, so you can easily assess your knowledge of every topic. Each question includes a detailed answer explanation.

Light up December

Welcome to December, the darkest month of the year in the northern hemisphere. It’s not surprising that all cultures and traditions in this area have celebrations involving lights or fires and feasting. We have displays of cookbooks from our extensive collection that you can check out for your holiday cooking.

Our December graduates will surely shine brightly on all around them. We wish them all the best as they leave us. Special thanks to our wonderful library student assistant Cassondra.

New Products in the Library include the Testing and Education Reference Center database. It has practice entrance exam questions for public safety jobs, for Accounting certification, Teacher Praxis exams, the GED, SAT, CLEP, LSAT, and many more. Also included are tools for assessing career choices, writing your resume, and interviewing.

GFCLearnFree is a resource that we’d like to reintroduce. This portal contains hundreds of free training tools for students and really any adult trying to function in the USA. Improve your computer keyboarding and mousing, understand how Excel spreadsheets work, get an overview of using social media tools, reading a transit map, and so much more.

November: Fly by the Library

Fly by the library this month and check out our display of aviation books. We won’t tell you to buzz off! We’ve got over 300 books on all aspects of flight technology, and children’s books too. Books are just the tip of our resources, which include access to 100 journals presenting and analyzing the latest in motor and aircraft designs, fluid dynamics, atmospheric experiments, and so forth. Search in our databases using the subject phrase “Aerospace sciences” or key words Astronautics or Aircraft.

November is National Aviation History Month, designated to celebrate the many accomplishments of our nation in these fields. The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s online exhibits are a rich resource. Currently posted are stunning photographs of the moon, along with collections highlighting how aeronautics changed our lives – and our minds.

If you search the library’s Indiana Memory database using the key word aviation, you will find that many pioneering aviators and aviation technologies were born in Indiana. Our Aviation Technology and Aviation Maintenance Technology programs will no doubt be hatching more!

Speaking of high-flyers, this month’s staff profile is our full-time Librarian Liz Metz.

What do you do at the Library?
I have been the Full-time Librarian for almost a year now. My main goal as Librarian is to make the Library accessible to students, faculty, and staff. I do this by helping people who visit the Library, creating guides for Library resources, and teaching classes about how to use the Library. I am responsible for collection and resource development for the School of Information Technology and the School of Arts, Sciences, and Education. I am also the cataloger here at Ivy Tech Community College Northeast, which means I get all of the new books in the computer so that they can be searched for and checked out.

How did you gain your expertise?
I completed my BS at Purdue University, focusing on Elementary Education. When I graduated in 2009, I ended up working two part-time positions in the same elementary school – one in the Library, and one as a Title I instructor. At the end of the school year, the funding for the Title I program was cut, and I was on the search for a new job – which is how I got my start here at Ivy Tech! I started as a circulation aide and between the two positions, I realized I really enjoyed working in a library, and I started working on my MLS online through IUPUI. Luck was with me, because shortly after I completed my MLS, the part-time librarian positon opened up. That position eventually turned into the full-time position I’m in now!

What is unique about you that could be of service to the Ivy Tech community?
My Elementary Education background has been beneficial when students come looking for children’s books – I can almost always find one that works. I’m also fascinated by tech and computers, and while I’m not an expert, I can usually figure out solutions to the problems students bring in.

What is your favorite thing to do outside the Library?
My husband and I are both gamers, and we really enjoy playing together. Right now I’m working my way through a re-play of the Kingdom Hearts games in anticipation of the tentative 2018 release date of a new game! I also have a bit of a zoo at home, and love snuggling with my four cats and 6-month-old German Shepherd, who I hope to train as a therapy dog.

What is a favorite book you would recommend?
When I’m looking for something fun to read, one author I always enjoy is Neil Gaiman. I love how he usually mixes in a little mythology to his writing, and presents a mixture of fantasy and suspense. I got to meet him a few years ago when he was on his signing tour for The Ocean at the End of the Lane and was extremely excited to have him sign my copy of Sandman Volume I.

What is a favorite website you would recommend?
I love puzzles and brain teasers, so I spend a lot of time on Conceptis Puzzles (http://www.conceptispuzzles.com/). Many of the puzzles need to be purchased, but they publish a new free puzzle in each category every Friday, and some of the categories are available as apps with even more free puzzles.

Don’t forget to check out our list of new releases – they are all fiction this month.

Everybody Lies

Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us about Who We Really Are

9780062390851-frBy Seth Stephens-Davidowitz
Call Number: QA76.9.D343 S685155 2017
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A former Google data scientist presents an insider’s look at what the vast, instantly available amounts of information from the Internet can reveal about human civilization and society.

How much sex are people really having? How many Americans are actually racist? Is America experiencing a hidden back-alley abortion crisis? Can you game the stock market? Does violent entertainment increase the rate of violent crime? Do parents treat sons differently from daughters? How many people actually read the books they buy? In this groundbreaking work, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a Harvard-trained economist, former Google data scientist, and New York Times writer, argues that much of what we thought about people has been dead wrong. The reason? People lie, to friends, lovers, doctors, surveys–and themselves. However, we no longer need to rely on what people tell us. New data from the internet–the traces of information that billions of people leave on Google, social media, dating, and even pornography sites–finally reveals the truth. By analyzing this digital goldmine, we can now learn what people really think, what they really want, and what they really do. Sometimes the new data will make you laugh out loud. Sometimes the new data will shock you. Sometimes the new data will deeply disturb you. But, always, this new data will make you think. This book will change the way you view the world. There is almost no limit to what can be learned about human nature from Big Data–provided, that is, you ask the right questions.

Changing Hours

Our Saturday hours are changing! On September 30th, we will begin opening at 9:00 a.m. and stay open until 1:45 p.m.

We have several new displays. A selection of books relevant to Hispanic Heritage Month are laid out near our north door for you to browse. They include Sonia Sotomayor’s best-selling My Beloved World.  You can check these out, too, right off the table!

Banned Books Week is September 25th -30th this year. We will have shelves of these dangerous items available for you to check out – they are part of our collections.

On our bulletin board outside our south door we are showcasing resources for courses in the School of Business, Logistics & Supply Chain. Did you know we have a dedicated Business Plan Pro workstation in the Library? Plus dozens of recent eBooks and hundreds of specialized articles.

While preparing this display I was temporarily captivated by logistics because there are so many recent innovations in this field. We’ve all heard of GPS but have you used an IPS – indoor positioning system? They are used in malls and other large spaces with many rooms. Each room or area has a transmitter using Bluetooth, WiFi or other medium; and with an app you can be directed to that specific place within the building. Wouldn’t an IPS have made those first days of classes much easier?

I recently read an article by the CMO of What3Words, a company that is providing addresses for the entire world. (Giles Rhys Jones, “Human Friendly Coordinates.” Geoinformatics, vol. 18, no. 5, 2016, pp. 10-12.) What3Words mapped the entire earth into 3-meter squares and assigned each a three-word address. Humans tend to mix up numbers – especially the long ones used by GPS systems – but research shows we can recall three random words. (They are indeed random with no connection to the purpose or neighborhood of the space so tagged.) The words are translated into local languages worldwide. This system has revolutionized humanitarian aid delivery and is allowing civil, legal, and financial services to reach communities that have been underserved. The What3Words app is free for iOS or Android, and the system now has many partners.

See you at dusty.puzzle.ritual!

Welcome to Fall Semester at Ivy Tech Northeast!

Over the summer we made some changes to our library website in order to serve you better

Let us know what you think!

From our homepage, when you click on the Articles link in the left navigation panel, you will now find the databases grouped by subject.

We have maintained the A-Z List which is alphabetical by title.

Instructors: We have changed a few of our database subscriptions, so please check on the resources available for your assignments. We encourage the use of Guides to point students to appropriate resources, whether databases, websites, or whatever. A Librarian will be delighted to set one up for your courses and sections. These can be linked to your IvyLearn course site too.

Requesting library instruction for your class is quicker and easier. Use the Schedule Instruction link on the left navigation panel and fill out the form, which is so self-explanatory that faculty are already using it. (A detailed mailing on this new system is being distributed.)

Students: Reserving the study rooms is now Self-Service! Use the Reserve Rooms link on the left navigation panel of the Library Home page. You can do this remotely on any device, or come in and use the kiosk at the front desk where our friendly staff will show you how.

Everyone: Check out our new Apps for College guide, which has collected the best mobile device apps especially useful to students and teachers.

Come on in and peruse our book display this month, which relates to the solar eclipse. You can check these books out, along with #1 NY Times Bestseller, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by the always-entertaining Neil de Grasse Tyson in our Baker & Taylor collection.

It’s not necessary to memorize all the numbers he throws around to understand the principles he explains. You will feel smarter just carrying this around!

New books we have received:

Behold the Dreamers “A compulsively readable debut novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream—the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy”
New York Times Bestseller – Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award – Longlisted for the PEN/Open Book Award – An ALA Notable Book

Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult “An irresistible, nostalgic, insightful—and totally original—ramble through classic children’s literature from Vanity Fair contributing editor (and father) Bruce Handy.”

The Driver “From the creator of the TV show Bones comes a ‘riveting, smart and funny’ (Harlan Coben) debut thriller. ‘Everything a great thriller should be—always smart, often funny, and relentlessly exciting. I loved every page.’ (Scott Turow)”

Coming soon:

The Burning Girl “A bracing, hypnotic coming-of-age story about the bond of best friends, from the New York Times best-selling author of The Emperor’s Children.”

Stay with Me “This celebrated, unforgettable first novel, shortlisted for the prestigious Bailey’s Prize and set in Nigeria, gives voice to both husband and wife as they tell the story of their marriage—and the forces that threaten to tear it apart.”

You can place holds on these books if they are not available using your IvyTech library account.

Best wishes to everyone for a successful semester!

In the steamy days of late summer, think of STEAM … and Steampunk

Ivy Tech takes another interim break in August, just before kids return to school. When the weather is hot and stormy, is a great time to indulge in crafting and hobbies.

Research shows these activities are good for your brain:
“Having at least one persistent and intellectually stimulating hobby is a better predictor of career success in any discipline than IQ, standardized test scores, or grades.”1
“Nobel laureates were: twenty-five times as likely as an average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be an artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other craft; four times as likely to be a musician; and twice as likely to be a photographer.”2

Educators know that the arts are a crucial addition to math, science, engineering and technology training. The non-linear problem-solving techniques, and creative flow, exercised in artistic endeavors stimulate innovation.

Crochet and knitting are used by mathematicians to demonstrate hyperbolic surfaces. Dr. Daina Taimina, visiting professor at Cornell University, was one of the pioneers in demonstrating hyperbolic crochet. Dr. Sarah-Marie Belcastro at Smith College and Dr. Carolyn Yackel at Mercer University publish on mathematical knitting. Dr. Maryam Mirzakhani, the Fields Medal winner who died of cancer July 14th, also worked on complex surfaces by “doodling” on large sheets of paper, writing the mathematical formulas in the margins.3

Margaret Wertheim explains the math of coral reefs using crocheted models from Dr. Taimina in a TED talk.

To get your creativity flowing, we have books to check out and page through on our DIY shelf in the Creative Commons. These are for all ages, and there are more crafting books in our children’s section.

We have access to the Hobbies and Crafts Reference Center as part of our databases subscription. This is an excellent resource for techniques tutorials and designs, linking to how-to instructions and creative ideas with full text and illustrations from periodicals and books. It is organized into broad categories you can browse: Arts & Crafts, Collecting, Home & Garden, Indoor Recreation [games], Kids’ Crafts, Model Building, Needlecrafts & Textiles, Outdoor Recreation, Performing Arts, Science & Technology, Scrapbooking & Paper Crafts. A keyword search will pull up periodicals and books on “cake decoration” and other such specific activities within these. Or, you can do a keyword search across all categories for style topics, like Cosplay or Steampunk. Both are well covered here, from clothing to cakes to household furnishings.

1 Milgram, R., and Hong, E. (1997). “Out-of-school activities in gifted adolescents as a predictor of vocational choice and work.” Journal Of Secondary Gifted Education 8/3:111. Quoted in Colegrove, T. (2017). “Editorial Board Thoughts: Arts into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – STEAM, Creative Abrasion, and the Opportunity in Libraries Today,” Information Technology and Libraries, 36/1:7. https://doi.org/10.6017/ital.v36i1.9733

2 Root-Bernstein, et al. (2008). “Arts Foster Scientific Success: Avocations of Nobel, National Academy, Royal Society, and Sigma Xi Members.” Journal of Psychology of Science and Technology https://doi.org/10.1891/1939-7054.1.2.51; quoted in Colegrove 2017.

3 http://news.stanford.edu/2017/07/15/maryam-mirzakhani-stanford-mathematician-and-fields-medal-winner-dies/